Developing an Aerobic Exercise Training Program for Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158755
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing an Aerobic Exercise Training Program for Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease
Abstract:
Developing an Aerobic Exercise Training Program for Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Yu, Fang, PhD, GNP-BC, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-160 WDH 1331, 308 Harvard St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:(612) 624 5435
Co-Authors:F. Yu, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; A.M. Kolanowski, School of Nursing, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA;
Physical activity and exercise is increasingly gaining academic and public audiences for their role in modifying cognition and delaying the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aerobic exercise might be a particularly salient intervention in AD due to its direct impact on brain structure and function. However, there are no clinical practice guidelines for aerobic exercise prescription and training in persons with AD. The purpose of this poster reported the development and implementation of a moderate aerobic exercise program for older adults with AD who resided in a retirement community. Recumbent stationary cycling is an excellent way to facilitate moderate-intensity aerobic exercise in older adults with AD. Stationary recumbent cycles provide comfortable back support, are non-weight bearing, allow for full range of motion, and do not require previous experience with cycling. The console of the cycle displays revolutions per minute (RPM) that is easily read by a trainer to cue persons with AD as they strive to reach the target intensity. They are particularly safe for older adults with arthritis or lower extremity weakness, conditions that might predispose them to falls in other exercise modalities like treadmills. Daily exercise goals are individualized based on the participant's past exercise and medical history, current daily routine, and tolerance level. During the eight weeks of training, the trainer cues participants to start cycling at a low level with zero resistance and then alternate the increase in cycling duration and intensity over weeks until the participant's tolerance is reached or until participants can cycle continuously for moderate intensity. Each cycling was concluded with cool-down stretches (see Table). Two participants with mild-to-moderate AD and medical clearance from their primary physicians were eligible for the program. Participant 1 was a 75-year-old male, and participant 2 was an 86-year-old female. Adherence rate to the aerobic exercise protocol was 95.8% for participant 1 and 100% for participant 2. No adverse events occurred during aerobic exercise. Both participants tolerated each adjustment in intensity and duration and progressed through the training protocol without difficulty (see Table).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping an Aerobic Exercise Training Program for Older Adults with Alzheimer's Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158755-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing an Aerobic Exercise Training Program for Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yu, Fang, PhD, GNP-BC, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-160 WDH 1331, 308 Harvard St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(612) 624 5435</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yuxxx244@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">F. Yu, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; A.M. Kolanowski, School of Nursing, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Physical activity and exercise is increasingly gaining academic and public audiences for their role in modifying cognition and delaying the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aerobic exercise might be a particularly salient intervention in AD due to its direct impact on brain structure and function. However, there are no clinical practice guidelines for aerobic exercise prescription and training in persons with AD. The purpose of this poster reported the development and implementation of a moderate aerobic exercise program for older adults with AD who resided in a retirement community. Recumbent stationary cycling is an excellent way to facilitate moderate-intensity aerobic exercise in older adults with AD. Stationary recumbent cycles provide comfortable back support, are non-weight bearing, allow for full range of motion, and do not require previous experience with cycling. The console of the cycle displays revolutions per minute (RPM) that is easily read by a trainer to cue persons with AD as they strive to reach the target intensity. They are particularly safe for older adults with arthritis or lower extremity weakness, conditions that might predispose them to falls in other exercise modalities like treadmills. Daily exercise goals are individualized based on the participant's past exercise and medical history, current daily routine, and tolerance level. During the eight weeks of training, the trainer cues participants to start cycling at a low level with zero resistance and then alternate the increase in cycling duration and intensity over weeks until the participant's tolerance is reached or until participants can cycle continuously for moderate intensity. Each cycling was concluded with cool-down stretches (see Table). Two participants with mild-to-moderate AD and medical clearance from their primary physicians were eligible for the program. Participant 1 was a 75-year-old male, and participant 2 was an 86-year-old female. Adherence rate to the aerobic exercise protocol was 95.8% for participant 1 and 100% for participant 2. No adverse events occurred during aerobic exercise. Both participants tolerated each adjustment in intensity and duration and progressed through the training protocol without difficulty (see Table).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:21:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:21:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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