2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158758
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing NMDS: Contextual covariates of patient outcomes
Abstract:
Nursing NMDS: Contextual covariates of patient outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Crossley, John, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cleveland Hospital
Title:Vice President Nursing
Contact Address:, Cleveland, OH, USA
Patient outcomes must be determined in relation to provider actions. Yet measuring these outcomes is a complex endeavor, complicated by the lack of standardized measures for contextual covariates. That is, there is a great need in research and in quality control efforts within health care to use standardized measures of organizational variables. The contextual variables include elements derived from the setting in which nursing care is delivered to patients which have an intervening effect on patient outcomes. Werley, Lang, Zorn, Devine and others have led efforts to identify a Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS). Consisting of demographic, service, and nursing elements, the data set was designed to link with other uniform health care data sets. Organizational elements, although necessary, are not included in the NMDS. An additional data set that would identify contextual variables known to be the critical link in determining the effect that nursing diagnoses and interventions have on patient outcomes is needed. Until nursing identifies, defines, and establishes measures for its most basic management, contextual variables, the concomitant work on nurse-sensitive patient outcomes will not be able to progress toward prediction. To address this need, researchers from nursing academia and practice representing expertise in nursing informatics and nursing service administration launched research efforts to develop a nursing management minimum data set (NMMDS). Designed to build on the Nursing Minimum Data Set efforts of Werley and colleagues, the NMMDS was defined as a set of variables needed by nurse managers for decision making about nursing care effectiveness. A national Delphi survey was completed on a 30 percent stratified random sample from the membership (N=4000) of the American Organization of Nurse Executives. A questionnaire, refined from pilot study, was used to solicit ratings about the necessity, clarity, collectibility, and measurability of the variables identified in pilot study as comprising the NMMDS. Face, content, and construct validity were addressed. Data analysis for each round included calculating measures of central tendency. Priority variables were identified by rank ordering of means. Means of <3.5 on a 1 to 5 low to high scale and a mode of <4.0 determined the level of consensus. The results reported include a listing of consensually derived management variables, definitions, and proposed measures. These contextual variables focus on the unit and institutional levels which, using relational databases, can be linked to clinical data related to individual patients. Discussion includes issues identified in the research, as well as plans for pilot testing of the NMMDS in acute, long term, and community clinical sites.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing NMDS: Contextual covariates of patient outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158758-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing NMDS: Contextual covariates of patient outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Crossley, John, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cleveland Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Vice President Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Cleveland, OH, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Patient outcomes must be determined in relation to provider actions. Yet measuring these outcomes is a complex endeavor, complicated by the lack of standardized measures for contextual covariates. That is, there is a great need in research and in quality control efforts within health care to use standardized measures of organizational variables. The contextual variables include elements derived from the setting in which nursing care is delivered to patients which have an intervening effect on patient outcomes. Werley, Lang, Zorn, Devine and others have led efforts to identify a Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS). Consisting of demographic, service, and nursing elements, the data set was designed to link with other uniform health care data sets. Organizational elements, although necessary, are not included in the NMDS. An additional data set that would identify contextual variables known to be the critical link in determining the effect that nursing diagnoses and interventions have on patient outcomes is needed. Until nursing identifies, defines, and establishes measures for its most basic management, contextual variables, the concomitant work on nurse-sensitive patient outcomes will not be able to progress toward prediction. To address this need, researchers from nursing academia and practice representing expertise in nursing informatics and nursing service administration launched research efforts to develop a nursing management minimum data set (NMMDS). Designed to build on the Nursing Minimum Data Set efforts of Werley and colleagues, the NMMDS was defined as a set of variables needed by nurse managers for decision making about nursing care effectiveness. A national Delphi survey was completed on a 30 percent stratified random sample from the membership (N=4000) of the American Organization of Nurse Executives. A questionnaire, refined from pilot study, was used to solicit ratings about the necessity, clarity, collectibility, and measurability of the variables identified in pilot study as comprising the NMMDS. Face, content, and construct validity were addressed. Data analysis for each round included calculating measures of central tendency. Priority variables were identified by rank ordering of means. Means of &lt;3.5 on a 1 to 5 low to high scale and a mode of &lt;4.0 determined the level of consensus. The results reported include a listing of consensually derived management variables, definitions, and proposed measures. These contextual variables focus on the unit and institutional levels which, using relational databases, can be linked to clinical data related to individual patients. Discussion includes issues identified in the research, as well as plans for pilot testing of the NMMDS in acute, long term, and community clinical sites.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:22:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:22:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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