Sexuality of the dying: What dying participants, their spouses and their caregivers teach us about the sexuality of the dying

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158760
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sexuality of the dying: What dying participants, their spouses and their caregivers teach us about the sexuality of the dying
Abstract:
Sexuality of the dying: What dying participants, their spouses and their caregivers teach us about the sexuality of the dying
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Lion, Elizabeth, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University, School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:1407 E. 10th St., Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA
Contact Telephone:8128556875
The focus of this naturalistic inquiry was to gain understanding and insight into the sexuality of the dying. Data were collected and analyzed from ten dying participants, eleven spouses, thirteen professional and fifteen nonprofessional caregivers of a hospice program. The dying participants and their spouses teach us that at the time of diagnosis of the terminal illness the concern for survival and success of the treatment obscured sexuality and altered patterns of sexual/affectional activities. During the treatment stage, alterations in the sexual/affectional activities were related to the physical, psychosocial and psychosexual impositions of the disease process and its concurrent treatments. During the living-dying stage the dying participants saw themselves and were seen by their spouses as diminishing in physical strength and energy and their sexual/affectional activities, though reduced in animation, became the body language through which the dying participants and their spouses expressed their continuing life and love.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSexuality of the dying: What dying participants, their spouses and their caregivers teach us about the sexuality of the dyingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158760-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sexuality of the dying: What dying participants, their spouses and their caregivers teach us about the sexuality of the dying</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lion, Elizabeth, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1407 E. 10th St., Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">8128556875</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The focus of this naturalistic inquiry was to gain understanding and insight into the sexuality of the dying. Data were collected and analyzed from ten dying participants, eleven spouses, thirteen professional and fifteen nonprofessional caregivers of a hospice program. The dying participants and their spouses teach us that at the time of diagnosis of the terminal illness the concern for survival and success of the treatment obscured sexuality and altered patterns of sexual/affectional activities. During the treatment stage, alterations in the sexual/affectional activities were related to the physical, psychosocial and psychosexual impositions of the disease process and its concurrent treatments. During the living-dying stage the dying participants saw themselves and were seen by their spouses as diminishing in physical strength and energy and their sexual/affectional activities, though reduced in animation, became the body language through which the dying participants and their spouses expressed their continuing life and love.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:22:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:22:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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