Nursing home residents’ surrogates: Preferences for involvement in decision-making

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158762
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing home residents’ surrogates: Preferences for involvement in decision-making
Abstract:
Nursing home residents’ surrogates: Preferences for involvement in decision-making
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Jeffers, Brenda
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Contact Address:Mennonite College of Nursing, Edwards Hall 204, Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790-5810, USA
Contact Telephone:309.438.2349
When nursing home residents are unable to participate in health care and treatment decision-making, a family member or designated surrogate is expected to become involved in decision-making and to make decisions on the resident’s behalf. Involvement of surrogate decision-makers has become the ethical and legal norm. However, little is known about surrogates’ preferences for involvement or satisfaction with their role in decision-making. The purpose of this study was to explore surrogate satisfaction with decision-making and preferences for involvement in health care decision-making for a nursing home resident. Structured interviews were conducted with 23 surrogates identified through purposive sampling. Surrogate satisfaction with health care decisions and perceptions of the resident’s health status were also assessed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Study findings indicate that surrogate desire for information about a resident’s health status during decision-making situations was greater than desire for involvement in making a treatment decision. Surrogates desired the most involvement in decision-making during stable health conditions and the least involvement during life-threatening illness. The majority of surrogates were satisfied with how decisions had been made. Findings suggest that surrogates desire less involvement in decision-making than commonly assumed or expected.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing home residents’ surrogates: Preferences for involvement in decision-makingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158762-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing home residents&rsquo; surrogates: Preferences for involvement in decision-making</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jeffers, Brenda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mennonite College of Nursing, Edwards Hall 204, Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790-5810, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309.438.2349</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">brjeffe@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">When nursing home residents are unable to participate in health care and treatment decision-making, a family member or designated surrogate is expected to become involved in decision-making and to make decisions on the resident&rsquo;s behalf. Involvement of surrogate decision-makers has become the ethical and legal norm. However, little is known about surrogates&rsquo; preferences for involvement or satisfaction with their role in decision-making. The purpose of this study was to explore surrogate satisfaction with decision-making and preferences for involvement in health care decision-making for a nursing home resident. Structured interviews were conducted with 23 surrogates identified through purposive sampling. Surrogate satisfaction with health care decisions and perceptions of the resident&rsquo;s health status were also assessed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Study findings indicate that surrogate desire for information about a resident&rsquo;s health status during decision-making situations was greater than desire for involvement in making a treatment decision. Surrogates desired the most involvement in decision-making during stable health conditions and the least involvement during life-threatening illness. The majority of surrogates were satisfied with how decisions had been made. Findings suggest that surrogates desire less involvement in decision-making than commonly assumed or expected.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:22:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:22:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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