2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158764
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ways of intervening with the escalating psychiatric patient
Abstract:
Ways of intervening with the escalating psychiatric patient
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Johnson, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina Street, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA
Contact Telephone:312.942.2766
Interventions that are aimed at preventing aggression on an inpatient psychiatric unit tend to fall into one of three categories: environmental manipulation, verbal de-escalation and/ or the use of prn medications. Although verbal escalation is acknowledged to be a complex process, there has been little empirical work in this area. Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe the practices of experienced nurses who are skilled at de-escalating an escalating psychiatric patient. Twenty experienced psychiatric were interviewed in an unstructured format and were asked to talk about their experiences with patients who were escalating. The taped interviews were transcribed verbatim and the resulting texts were analyzed within the framework of hermeneutic phenomenology. The analysis revealed that the nurses in the study were skilled at reading the individual patient's cues, understanding the particular situation as it was unfolding, interpreting the meaning of the individual patient's behavior, connecting with the patient and matching the intervention with what the patient needed at the moment. From this study, it became evident that these nurses were successful at de-escalating patients because they had an appreciation of the context of the situation and could individualized their ways of intervening.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWays of intervening with the escalating psychiatric patienten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158764-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ways of intervening with the escalating psychiatric patient</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina Street, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.942.2766</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mjohnson1@rushu.rush.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Interventions that are aimed at preventing aggression on an inpatient psychiatric unit tend to fall into one of three categories: environmental manipulation, verbal de-escalation and/ or the use of prn medications. Although verbal escalation is acknowledged to be a complex process, there has been little empirical work in this area. Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe the practices of experienced nurses who are skilled at de-escalating an escalating psychiatric patient. Twenty experienced psychiatric were interviewed in an unstructured format and were asked to talk about their experiences with patients who were escalating. The taped interviews were transcribed verbatim and the resulting texts were analyzed within the framework of hermeneutic phenomenology. The analysis revealed that the nurses in the study were skilled at reading the individual patient's cues, understanding the particular situation as it was unfolding, interpreting the meaning of the individual patient's behavior, connecting with the patient and matching the intervention with what the patient needed at the moment. From this study, it became evident that these nurses were successful at de-escalating patients because they had an appreciation of the context of the situation and could individualized their ways of intervening.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:22:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:22:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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