Biopsychosocial effects of the boot strap intervention in Navy recruits: A preliminary reports

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158765
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Biopsychosocial effects of the boot strap intervention in Navy recruits: A preliminary reports
Abstract:
Biopsychosocial effects of the boot strap intervention in Navy recruits: A preliminary reports
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Williams, Reg
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.4927
Recruit training is a specific, controlled situation in which young men and women are subjected to stress through physical activities, changes in daily life conditions, separation from social supports, and intense emotional and intellectual challenges. Using Stewart's response to stress model, the purpose of this prospective study is to investigate effects of a cognitive-behavioral intervention called Boot Camp Survival Training for Navy Recruits-A Prescription (BOOT STRAP) on stress, depression, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) functioning, interpersonal relatedness, and recruit training performance outcomes. To date we have completed only preliminary data analysis on 74 recruits that have completed basic training (total will be 640 recruits). A group of 20 recruits "at-risk" for depression were randomly assigned to the intervention. Analysis is ongoing, but preliminary results revealed that recruits who received the intervention significantly increased their sense of belonging, experienced less loneliness, and decreased insecure attachment at the end of recruit training. Preliminary examination of the cortisol levels as a measure of HPA stress axis function revealed significant distinctive patterns in the three groups (controls, intervention and non-intervention groups). This study should provide further refinement of the model of depression onset and possible use of salivary cortisol levels as a screening measure for risk of depression.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBiopsychosocial effects of the boot strap intervention in Navy recruits: A preliminary reportsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158765-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Biopsychosocial effects of the boot strap intervention in Navy recruits: A preliminary reports</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Reg</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.4927</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rawill@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recruit training is a specific, controlled situation in which young men and women are subjected to stress through physical activities, changes in daily life conditions, separation from social supports, and intense emotional and intellectual challenges. Using Stewart's response to stress model, the purpose of this prospective study is to investigate effects of a cognitive-behavioral intervention called Boot Camp Survival Training for Navy Recruits-A Prescription (BOOT STRAP) on stress, depression, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) functioning, interpersonal relatedness, and recruit training performance outcomes. To date we have completed only preliminary data analysis on 74 recruits that have completed basic training (total will be 640 recruits). A group of 20 recruits &quot;at-risk&quot; for depression were randomly assigned to the intervention. Analysis is ongoing, but preliminary results revealed that recruits who received the intervention significantly increased their sense of belonging, experienced less loneliness, and decreased insecure attachment at the end of recruit training. Preliminary examination of the cortisol levels as a measure of HPA stress axis function revealed significant distinctive patterns in the three groups (controls, intervention and non-intervention groups). This study should provide further refinement of the model of depression onset and possible use of salivary cortisol levels as a screening measure for risk of depression.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:22:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:22:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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