2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158768
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mother-infant interaction in very low income, high risk families
Abstract:
Mother-infant interaction in very low income, high risk families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Schiffman, Rachel, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:College of Nursing
Michigan State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:A 230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:5173556523
Multiple factors influence the development of children including parent-infant interaction. Because caregivers, especially mothers, have a significant role in their children's development, assessments and interventions must include the transactions between the mother-child dyad. Mothers must be sensitive to their children; the children in turn must be responsive and clear. Using the Barnard Model (1994), this interactive dyadic "dance" can be assessed and interventions planned. As part of a larger study of early intervention, interactions of 182 very low income mothers and their infants during a planned teaching situation in the home were observed by trained data collectors using the NCAST Teaching Scale (Barnard, 1994). The mothers were primarily white, single, and in their early twenties. Almost 50% of the mothers scored below the 10th percentile cut-off and scored at least one standard deviation below the NCAST mean on some scales. Most infants scored above the 10th percentile. Defecits in multiple areas of interaction indicate mothers may need to be made aware that their infants can engage in meaningful interactions. Nurses can use NCAST to help mothers better understand their role in teaching and interacting with their infants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMother-infant interaction in very low income, high risk familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158768-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mother-infant interaction in very low income, high risk families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schiffman, Rachel, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing<br/>Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">A 230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">5173556523</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Multiple factors influence the development of children including parent-infant interaction. Because caregivers, especially mothers, have a significant role in their children's development, assessments and interventions must include the transactions between the mother-child dyad. Mothers must be sensitive to their children; the children in turn must be responsive and clear. Using the Barnard Model (1994), this interactive dyadic &quot;dance&quot; can be assessed and interventions planned. As part of a larger study of early intervention, interactions of 182 very low income mothers and their infants during a planned teaching situation in the home were observed by trained data collectors using the NCAST Teaching Scale (Barnard, 1994). The mothers were primarily white, single, and in their early twenties. Almost 50% of the mothers scored below the 10th percentile cut-off and scored at least one standard deviation below the NCAST mean on some scales. Most infants scored above the 10th percentile. Defecits in multiple areas of interaction indicate mothers may need to be made aware that their infants can engage in meaningful interactions. Nurses can use NCAST to help mothers better understand their role in teaching and interacting with their infants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:22:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:22:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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