2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158770
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptoms of sleep disturbances among children seen at general pediatric clinics
Abstract:
Symptoms of sleep disturbances among children seen at general pediatric clinics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Hedger, Kristen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan Health System
Contact Address:1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.9241
Introduction: The prevalence and nature of sleep disturbances among children have not been well described. We surveyed parents at two general pediatric clinics about symptoms of sleep disturbances in their children. Methods: Subjects were 706 children, 2-13.9 years old whose parents completed a validated Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. Data were grouped according to subjects' age: group A, 2-4.9 years (N=260); B, 5-7.9 (N=202); C, 8-10.9 (N=153); and D, 11-13.9 (N=91). Results: Habitual snoring, defined as snoring more than half of the time while asleep, reportedly occurred in 18.1% of the subjects, 23.4% of whom also had excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). In the total sample, EDS was reported in 14.9%, sleep walking in 13.3%, night terrors in 25.5%, and nocturnal bruxism in 27.8%. One or more of 4 main symptoms of insomnia were present in 41.5% of the total sample and 2 or more insomnia symptoms were particularly common in groups A & C (?2, p=.002). Conclusions: These results suggest that symptoms of potentially important sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, may be common in children seen in general pediatric practices. These disorders frequently remain undiagnosed, and nurses should include questions about sleep-related symptoms in their assessment of pediatric clients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptoms of sleep disturbances among children seen at general pediatric clinicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158770-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptoms of sleep disturbances among children seen at general pediatric clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hedger, Kristen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan Health System</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.9241</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">khedger@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: The prevalence and nature of sleep disturbances among children have not been well described. We surveyed parents at two general pediatric clinics about symptoms of sleep disturbances in their children. Methods: Subjects were 706 children, 2-13.9 years old whose parents completed a validated Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. Data were grouped according to subjects' age: group A, 2-4.9 years (N=260); B, 5-7.9 (N=202); C, 8-10.9 (N=153); and D, 11-13.9 (N=91). Results: Habitual snoring, defined as snoring more than half of the time while asleep, reportedly occurred in 18.1% of the subjects, 23.4% of whom also had excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). In the total sample, EDS was reported in 14.9%, sleep walking in 13.3%, night terrors in 25.5%, and nocturnal bruxism in 27.8%. One or more of 4 main symptoms of insomnia were present in 41.5% of the total sample and 2 or more insomnia symptoms were particularly common in groups A &amp; C (?2, p=.002). Conclusions: These results suggest that symptoms of potentially important sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, may be common in children seen in general pediatric practices. These disorders frequently remain undiagnosed, and nurses should include questions about sleep-related symptoms in their assessment of pediatric clients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:22:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:22:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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