2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158771
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Normative obligations to older kin after divorce and remarriage
Abstract:
Normative obligations to older kin after divorce and remarriage
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Ganong, Lawrence
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri
Contact Address:S313 School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211-4120, USA
Contact Telephone:3148822121
Normative beliefs influence how individuals define their obligations to others, and what family members do is shaped by cultural norms about what should be done. An important step in developing clinical interventions for families is to determine extant normative beliefs about family obligations. Purpose. The purpose of this project was to examine normative beliefs about intergenerational obligations following divorce and remarriage. Findings from six studies and a model of normative intergenerational obligations based on those findings will be presented. Samples. Randomly sampled adults (n=6100) from rural and urban communities in Missouri. Methods. Participants were presented multiple-paragraph vignettes. They were asked to make judgments about intergenerational responsibilities. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected. Each investigation asked about different ways to assist. Family structure was a variable in all studies, and other variables (e.g., gender, quality of relationships, prior commitments) were included in one or more of the studies. Results. Beliefs about intergenerational responsibilities following divorce and remarriage were related to: (1) kin type (genetic or affinal), (2) relationship quality, (3) resources, (4) need acuity, (5) prior commitments, and (6) prior exchange patterns (reciprocal or non-reciprocal). Conclusions. Intergenerational obligation norms are contextual, and more complex than prior research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNormative obligations to older kin after divorce and remarriageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158771-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Normative obligations to older kin after divorce and remarriage</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ganong, Lawrence</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">S313 School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211-4120, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3148822121</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Normative beliefs influence how individuals define their obligations to others, and what family members do is shaped by cultural norms about what should be done. An important step in developing clinical interventions for families is to determine extant normative beliefs about family obligations. Purpose. The purpose of this project was to examine normative beliefs about intergenerational obligations following divorce and remarriage. Findings from six studies and a model of normative intergenerational obligations based on those findings will be presented. Samples. Randomly sampled adults (n=6100) from rural and urban communities in Missouri. Methods. Participants were presented multiple-paragraph vignettes. They were asked to make judgments about intergenerational responsibilities. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected. Each investigation asked about different ways to assist. Family structure was a variable in all studies, and other variables (e.g., gender, quality of relationships, prior commitments) were included in one or more of the studies. Results. Beliefs about intergenerational responsibilities following divorce and remarriage were related to: (1) kin type (genetic or affinal), (2) relationship quality, (3) resources, (4) need acuity, (5) prior commitments, and (6) prior exchange patterns (reciprocal or non-reciprocal). Conclusions. Intergenerational obligation norms are contextual, and more complex than prior research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:22:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:22:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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