Nutritional intake and growth of the very low birthweight infant in the first two weeks of life

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158775
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nutritional intake and growth of the very low birthweight infant in the first two weeks of life
Abstract:
Nutritional intake and growth of the very low birthweight infant in the first two weeks of life
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Armbruster, Debra
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Newton Hall 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Contact Telephone:614.272.4041
Very low birthweight infants (VLBW) (birthweight less than 1500 grams) develop a growth deficit with a significant proportion of this deficit occurring in the first seven days of life. Their growth lags 3-5 % behind infants born at comparable gestational ages. The medical stability of these infants takes precedence over their nutritional management. One reason for this growth deficit is the inability to provide adequate calories for growth. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively examine relationships among birthweight, nutritional intake, and growth velocity during the first two week of life in 27 VLBW infants. Daily weights and nutritional intake were extracted from the medical record. Significant findings included VLBW infants with the poorest growth lost the highest percentage of birthweight, took the longest time to regain birthweight, and had the slowest growth velocity. By day of life 7, infants developed a protein deficit of 11.4 gms/kg, and an energy deficit of 314 kcal/kg, with birthweight having a significantly negative relationship to both. These deficits increased through day of life 14. More research is needed to better understand the relationships of growth and nutritional intake requirements of VLBW infants during the first two weeks of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNutritional intake and growth of the very low birthweight infant in the first two weeks of lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158775-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nutritional intake and growth of the very low birthweight infant in the first two weeks of life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Armbruster, Debra</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Newton Hall 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614.272.4041</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">armbruster.14@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Very low birthweight infants (VLBW) (birthweight less than 1500 grams) develop a growth deficit with a significant proportion of this deficit occurring in the first seven days of life. Their growth lags 3-5 % behind infants born at comparable gestational ages. The medical stability of these infants takes precedence over their nutritional management. One reason for this growth deficit is the inability to provide adequate calories for growth. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively examine relationships among birthweight, nutritional intake, and growth velocity during the first two week of life in 27 VLBW infants. Daily weights and nutritional intake were extracted from the medical record. Significant findings included VLBW infants with the poorest growth lost the highest percentage of birthweight, took the longest time to regain birthweight, and had the slowest growth velocity. By day of life 7, infants developed a protein deficit of 11.4 gms/kg, and an energy deficit of 314 kcal/kg, with birthweight having a significantly negative relationship to both. These deficits increased through day of life 14. More research is needed to better understand the relationships of growth and nutritional intake requirements of VLBW infants during the first two weeks of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:23:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:23:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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