Gestures: A communication method for nonvocal ventilator-dependent critically ill patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158782
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gestures: A communication method for nonvocal ventilator-dependent critically ill patients
Abstract:
Gestures: A communication method for nonvocal ventilator-dependent critically ill patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Connolly, Maria, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA
Contact Telephone:708.216.9553
Inability to communicate effectively is a continuing problem for mechanically ventilated (MV) patients and the nurses caring for them. This pilot study focused on the efficacy of gestural intervention using an instructional videotape of well-understood gestures. Research questions were: (1) How effective is the use of well-understood gestures in helping mechanically ventilated patients communicate? And (2) What are psychosocial implications of this gestural method for MV patients? Subjects were intubated < 14 days, nonvocal and on a ventilator. Demographic and survey data and POMS were collected on a convenience sample of ICU patients and their nurses at a large medical center. Nurses were shown the videotape and taught the lexicon of gestures to be used with their MV patients. Of the fifty-four MV subjects, ten intervention subjects and eight control subjects completed the study. Seventy percent nurse respondents found the communication method difficult to use and 50% reported the communications method was too time-consuming. Serendipitous findings was the large attrition rate of MV patients due to paralytics and sedation, amnesia post-MV experience, change in caregivers (nurses), and death. Videotaped lexicon of gestures needs to be tested with a larger sample of both short and long-term MV patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGestures: A communication method for nonvocal ventilator-dependent critically ill patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158782-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gestures: A communication method for nonvocal ventilator-dependent critically ill patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connolly, Maria, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708.216.9553</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mconnol@luc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Inability to communicate effectively is a continuing problem for mechanically ventilated (MV) patients and the nurses caring for them. This pilot study focused on the efficacy of gestural intervention using an instructional videotape of well-understood gestures. Research questions were: (1) How effective is the use of well-understood gestures in helping mechanically ventilated patients communicate? And (2) What are psychosocial implications of this gestural method for MV patients? Subjects were intubated &lt; 14 days, nonvocal and on a ventilator. Demographic and survey data and POMS were collected on a convenience sample of ICU patients and their nurses at a large medical center. Nurses were shown the videotape and taught the lexicon of gestures to be used with their MV patients. Of the fifty-four MV subjects, ten intervention subjects and eight control subjects completed the study. Seventy percent nurse respondents found the communication method difficult to use and 50% reported the communications method was too time-consuming. Serendipitous findings was the large attrition rate of MV patients due to paralytics and sedation, amnesia post-MV experience, change in caregivers (nurses), and death. Videotaped lexicon of gestures needs to be tested with a larger sample of both short and long-term MV patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:23:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:23:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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