2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158784
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The influence of social support on weight management in women
Abstract:
The influence of social support on weight management in women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Gulanick, Meg, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA
Contact Telephone:708.216.9687
Weight management is an ongoing struggle for most women. Social support, social networks, and social cognitive theory served as the theoretical base for exploring the promotion of positive behavior change. Using a focus group interview design, this study examined the influence of social support in two groups of women at a university worksite. The themes of stages of change, empowerment, and quality of social support predominated. Both groups expressed similar reasons for concern about weight, and shared many common experiences. However the two groups expressed very different outcomes from the social support they identified. One group (n=9) with ongoing difficulty with weight loss ("contemplators") described social support experiences that diminished their empowerment and fostered a comfortable status quo. In contrast, the successful ("action") group (n=7) facilitated a positive, therapeutic environment using the Weight Watchers model. They readily described key factors that facilitated their weight loss. This study concludes that weight loss is an ongoing challenge for most women. However, fostering a positive social support network can result in achievable outcomes. Findings from this study highlight the variety of characteristics, quality, and outcomes of social support experienced by a cohort of overweight
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe influence of social support on weight management in womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158784-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The influence of social support on weight management in women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gulanick, Meg, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708.216.9687</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mgulani@luc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Weight management is an ongoing struggle for most women. Social support, social networks, and social cognitive theory served as the theoretical base for exploring the promotion of positive behavior change. Using a focus group interview design, this study examined the influence of social support in two groups of women at a university worksite. The themes of stages of change, empowerment, and quality of social support predominated. Both groups expressed similar reasons for concern about weight, and shared many common experiences. However the two groups expressed very different outcomes from the social support they identified. One group (n=9) with ongoing difficulty with weight loss (&quot;contemplators&quot;) described social support experiences that diminished their empowerment and fostered a comfortable status quo. In contrast, the successful (&quot;action&quot;) group (n=7) facilitated a positive, therapeutic environment using the Weight Watchers model. They readily described key factors that facilitated their weight loss. This study concludes that weight loss is an ongoing challenge for most women. However, fostering a positive social support network can result in achievable outcomes. Findings from this study highlight the variety of characteristics, quality, and outcomes of social support experienced by a cohort of overweight</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:23:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:23:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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