2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158786
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Descriptive study of resources for depression on the web
Abstract:
Descriptive study of resources for depression on the web
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Holdcraft, Carol
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing and Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Contact Telephone:937.775.3134
The Internet is changing how the public obtains information. Nearly 50% of United States Internet users spend time searching for health information. Purpose: to develop criteria and evaluate web-based information resources for depression. Conceptual framework: the Technology Assessment Model includes assessment of need, safety, efficacy and effectiveness, economic appraisal, and social impact. Method: clinical practice guidelines for depression and criteria for web site evaluation were combined to develop a tool with 28 yes/no questions addressing positive content, 4 yes/no questions addressing negative content, and 11 Likert-scale questions addressing site construction/format (Cronbach's alpha=0.944). This exploratory, descriptive study located and evaluated web sites for depression. Sample: 91 web sites (37 duplicates) for depression information at 2 intervals, 3 months apart in February and May 2000. Results: of 54 total web sites found in February and May, only 79% were consistently available, and 68.5% could be rated both times. Conclusions: highest ranking web sites contained positive content, no negative content, and were from a variety of sources. Lowest ranking web sites promoted unusual treatments for depression, some were commercialized, and some had questionable authors. Further research is needed to continue validation of instrument used to evaluate quality of web sites.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDescriptive study of resources for depression on the weben_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158786-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Descriptive study of resources for depression on the web</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holdcraft, Carol</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing and Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937.775.3134</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carol.holdcraft@wright.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Internet is changing how the public obtains information. Nearly 50% of United States Internet users spend time searching for health information. Purpose: to develop criteria and evaluate web-based information resources for depression. Conceptual framework: the Technology Assessment Model includes assessment of need, safety, efficacy and effectiveness, economic appraisal, and social impact. Method: clinical practice guidelines for depression and criteria for web site evaluation were combined to develop a tool with 28 yes/no questions addressing positive content, 4 yes/no questions addressing negative content, and 11 Likert-scale questions addressing site construction/format (Cronbach's alpha=0.944). This exploratory, descriptive study located and evaluated web sites for depression. Sample: 91 web sites (37 duplicates) for depression information at 2 intervals, 3 months apart in February and May 2000. Results: of 54 total web sites found in February and May, only 79% were consistently available, and 68.5% could be rated both times. Conclusions: highest ranking web sites contained positive content, no negative content, and were from a variety of sources. Lowest ranking web sites promoted unusual treatments for depression, some were commercialized, and some had questionable authors. Further research is needed to continue validation of instrument used to evaluate quality of web sites.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:23:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:23:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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