2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158788
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"JOB" of IV insertion by expert nurses
Abstract:
"JOB" of IV insertion by expert nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Jacobson, Ann, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Contact Telephone:330.672.8815
Intravenous catheter (IV) insertion is one of the most frequent, yet technically difficult, invasive procedures performed by nurses. This study used a modification of the chronology and the "think aloud" methods to examine IV insertion techniques. Seven nurses, identified as experts in IV insertion by their peers and/or nurse managers, were audiotaped as they "thought aloud" while inserting IVs in adult hospital patients. The tapes were transcribed and the transcripts were collated with investigator-recorded observations. The investigators read the transcripts and identified preliminary and final coding categories. Transcripts were coded independently by each investigator and compared for agreement. The analysis revealed that inserting an IV is a distinct "job" in a nurse's work. The insertion followed a consistent pattern marked, however, by variations according to differences in patients and the situation. Nurses described veins and IV insertion with a rich and diverse vocabulary and displayed a wide range of "tricks" for optimizing insertion success. Nurses elicited patient cooperation in the "job" of getting the IV started and used different therapeutic communication techniques. Nurses reflected on their own job performance in IV insertion and recounted stories of "worst-case scenarios" as well as how they acquired and teach IV insertion skills.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"JOB" of IV insertion by expert nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158788-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">&quot;JOB&quot; of IV insertion by expert nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jacobson, Ann, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.672.8815</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ajacobso@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Intravenous catheter (IV) insertion is one of the most frequent, yet technically difficult, invasive procedures performed by nurses. This study used a modification of the chronology and the &quot;think aloud&quot; methods to examine IV insertion techniques. Seven nurses, identified as experts in IV insertion by their peers and/or nurse managers, were audiotaped as they &quot;thought aloud&quot; while inserting IVs in adult hospital patients. The tapes were transcribed and the transcripts were collated with investigator-recorded observations. The investigators read the transcripts and identified preliminary and final coding categories. Transcripts were coded independently by each investigator and compared for agreement. The analysis revealed that inserting an IV is a distinct &quot;job&quot; in a nurse's work. The insertion followed a consistent pattern marked, however, by variations according to differences in patients and the situation. Nurses described veins and IV insertion with a rich and diverse vocabulary and displayed a wide range of &quot;tricks&quot; for optimizing insertion success. Nurses elicited patient cooperation in the &quot;job&quot; of getting the IV started and used different therapeutic communication techniques. Nurses reflected on their own job performance in IV insertion and recounted stories of &quot;worst-case scenarios&quot; as well as how they acquired and teach IV insertion skills.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:23:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:23:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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