Prevention of pressure ulcers in community-residing persons with a spinal cord injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158790
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevention of pressure ulcers in community-residing persons with a spinal cord injury
Abstract:
Prevention of pressure ulcers in community-residing persons with a spinal cord injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:King, Rosemarie
P.I. Institution Name:Northwestern University Medical School
Contact Address:Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chicago, IL, 60208, USA
Contact Telephone:312.908.8038
Interventions to prevent pressure ulcers (PU) in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) have been tested rarely. The purpose of this experimental study, guided by the Health Belief Model, was to examine the efficacy of a behavioral protocol on PU development and costs. Subjects are 114 adults with SCI in their first hospitalization, who were discharged to home. Subjects, who were assigned randomly to treatment or usual care group, were recruited during acute rehabilitation and followed for 4 months postdischarge. Skin was examined during home or clinic visits. PU severity was assessed using National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel staging. The treatment group received usual care and a tailored intervention based on PU risk, self-efficacy, and self-care barriers. Chi-square and t-tests, respectively, will be used to examine group differences in PU incidence and severity, days to PU, and PU costs. Preliminary findings (n=92) indicated that PU incidence rates in treatment (18%) and usual care groups (20%) were not significantly different. A severe PU developed in a significantly greater proportion of usual care subjects (20%) than treatment subjects (2%) (p <.01). Results will guide PU prevention in clinical settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevention of pressure ulcers in community-residing persons with a spinal cord injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158790-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prevention of pressure ulcers in community-residing persons with a spinal cord injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">King, Rosemarie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwestern University Medical School</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chicago, IL, 60208, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.908.8038</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rbking@northwestern.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Interventions to prevent pressure ulcers (PU) in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) have been tested rarely. The purpose of this experimental study, guided by the Health Belief Model, was to examine the efficacy of a behavioral protocol on PU development and costs. Subjects are 114 adults with SCI in their first hospitalization, who were discharged to home. Subjects, who were assigned randomly to treatment or usual care group, were recruited during acute rehabilitation and followed for 4 months postdischarge. Skin was examined during home or clinic visits. PU severity was assessed using National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel staging. The treatment group received usual care and a tailored intervention based on PU risk, self-efficacy, and self-care barriers. Chi-square and t-tests, respectively, will be used to examine group differences in PU incidence and severity, days to PU, and PU costs. Preliminary findings (n=92) indicated that PU incidence rates in treatment (18%) and usual care groups (20%) were not significantly different. A severe PU developed in a significantly greater proportion of usual care subjects (20%) than treatment subjects (2%) (p &lt;.01). Results will guide PU prevention in clinical settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:23:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:23:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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