High dietary calcium intake does not cause excessive weight gain in pubertal girls

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158791
Type:
Presentation
Title:
High dietary calcium intake does not cause excessive weight gain in pubertal girls
Abstract:
High dietary calcium intake does not cause excessive weight gain in pubertal girls
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Lappe, Joan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Creighton University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 601 North 30th Street, Omaha, NE, 68131-2137, USA
Contact Telephone:402.280.4470
Although it is widely accepted that adequate calcium is essential for maximal development of bone mass during childhood and adolescence, concern exists that high calcium diets may lead to excessive weight gain. The purpose of this analysis is to determine if pubertal females on high dietary calcium diets experience significantly greater increase in weight than pubertal females on their usual calcium intakes. The framework is human physiology. The analysis was conducted on data from an experimental study to test the effect of increasing dietary calcium intake to 1500 mg/day on increases in bone quality in pubertal females. The sample includes 59 pubertal females (mean age 11.5±0.3 years) who completed two years of study. According to diet diaries completed quarterly by the girls and their parents, the group on their usual diet consumes an average of 850 mg of calcium/day while the high calcium group consumes an average of 1649 mg/day, primarily from dairy foods. Two-tailed t-tests indicate no significant differences between the treatment and control groups in rate of change in weight or body mass index from baseline to the two-year measurement. Thus, high dietary calcium is not contributing to excessive weight gain in this group of girls.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHigh dietary calcium intake does not cause excessive weight gain in pubertal girlsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158791-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">High dietary calcium intake does not cause excessive weight gain in pubertal girls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lappe, Joan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Creighton University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 601 North 30th Street, Omaha, NE, 68131-2137, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402.280.4470</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmlappe@creighton.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although it is widely accepted that adequate calcium is essential for maximal development of bone mass during childhood and adolescence, concern exists that high calcium diets may lead to excessive weight gain. The purpose of this analysis is to determine if pubertal females on high dietary calcium diets experience significantly greater increase in weight than pubertal females on their usual calcium intakes. The framework is human physiology. The analysis was conducted on data from an experimental study to test the effect of increasing dietary calcium intake to 1500 mg/day on increases in bone quality in pubertal females. The sample includes 59 pubertal females (mean age 11.5&plusmn;0.3 years) who completed two years of study. According to diet diaries completed quarterly by the girls and their parents, the group on their usual diet consumes an average of 850 mg of calcium/day while the high calcium group consumes an average of 1649 mg/day, primarily from dairy foods. Two-tailed t-tests indicate no significant differences between the treatment and control groups in rate of change in weight or body mass index from baseline to the two-year measurement. Thus, high dietary calcium is not contributing to excessive weight gain in this group of girls.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:24:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:24:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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