Risk factors for cardiovascular disease in an inner-city, underserved, older adult population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158795
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Risk factors for cardiovascular disease in an inner-city, underserved, older adult population
Abstract:
Risk factors for cardiovascular disease in an inner-city, underserved, older adult population
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Moore, Susan, MS/MSc
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive NU312C, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5107, USA
Contact Telephone:317.274.8579
A major health problem in the African American population is poorly controlled hypertension. The National High Blood Pressure Education Program has made strides, but poor control still exists with greater incidence of strokes, kidney, and heart diseases in minorities. The Health Belief Model has been researched to provide an understanding for poor control in this population. A randomly sampled minority population, 240 adults 50 years and older were assessed from an inner-city underserved area, with an additional 102 older adults from public housing units. Risk factors for this populations were numerous. 68.7% were above ideal body weight and 21% had diabetes with 23% having a blood sugar >200 with mean=301 /range of 225 to 436. 31.3% were current smokers of 15.7 cigarettes per day and 25% drank alcohol beverages with 14% consuming 3+ drinks per day. 42% of the population saw themselves as having fair to poor health. Compounded with these risk factors was that 24% of the sample had no health insurance. Multiple approaches would be important such as determining stage of change, using marketing strategies targeted to population, developing cultural sensitive programs, offering accessible programs, and increasing coverage for uninsured.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRisk factors for cardiovascular disease in an inner-city, underserved, older adult populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158795-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Risk factors for cardiovascular disease in an inner-city, underserved, older adult population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moore, Susan, MS/MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive NU312C, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5107, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317.274.8579</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smoore@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A major health problem in the African American population is poorly controlled hypertension. The National High Blood Pressure Education Program has made strides, but poor control still exists with greater incidence of strokes, kidney, and heart diseases in minorities. The Health Belief Model has been researched to provide an understanding for poor control in this population. A randomly sampled minority population, 240 adults 50 years and older were assessed from an inner-city underserved area, with an additional 102 older adults from public housing units. Risk factors for this populations were numerous. 68.7% were above ideal body weight and 21% had diabetes with 23% having a blood sugar &gt;200 with mean=301 /range of 225 to 436. 31.3% were current smokers of 15.7 cigarettes per day and 25% drank alcohol beverages with 14% consuming 3+ drinks per day. 42% of the population saw themselves as having fair to poor health. Compounded with these risk factors was that 24% of the sample had no health insurance. Multiple approaches would be important such as determining stage of change, using marketing strategies targeted to population, developing cultural sensitive programs, offering accessible programs, and increasing coverage for uninsured.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:24:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:24:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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