The Effects of the New Mothers Network on Single, Low-Income, African American Mothers' Psychological, Parenting, and Health Care Utilization Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158799
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of the New Mothers Network on Single, Low-Income, African American Mothers' Psychological, Parenting, and Health Care Utilization Outcomes
Abstract:
The Effects of the New Mothers Network on Single, Low-Income, African American Mothers' Psychological, Parenting, and Health Care Utilization Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Brage-Hudson, Diane, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:43nd & Emile, Omaha, NE, 68198, USA
Contact Telephone:720-898-4831
Co-Authors:D. Brage-Hudson, C. Campbell-Grossman, M. Hertzog, R. Keating-Lefler, , University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Problem: According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services (2007), 69% of African American births are to single mothers. Almost 40% (5.4 million) of these mothers live below the poverty level (DeNavas-Walt, Proctor, & Smith, 2008). The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects on an Internet-based intervention, the New Mothers Network (NMN), on single, low-income, African American mothers' psychological, parenting, and health care utilization outcomes. Theoretical Framework: The study was based on social support theory (House, 1981). Social support included psychological and informational resources for mothers through the NMN and through their relationships with nurses and other mothers who were electronically connected. Methodology: Mothers were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the NMN Intervention Group or the Control Group in this longitudinal study. For participants in the Intervention Group, MSNTV was installed in subjects' homes and connected to the Internet. Data were collected at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months following the infant's birth. Analysis: Data were analyzed using a linear mixed model, repeated-measures ANOVA, and chi-square tests. Results: Although viewed with caution due to the small sample size, reported self esteem (p<.05) and loneliness (p=.06) were significant in some analyses. For infant health services utilized, 70.6% (n=12) of those in the usual care group took their infant to the emergency room at least once during the study compared to 35.7% (n=5) of the mothers receiving the intervention X2 (1, N=31) = 4.01 (p=.05). Intervention revisions and futher focus on monitoring health care services will be presented in future studies. Nursing Implications: The NMN allowed mothers to share their experiences and acquire information from nurses about caring for themselves and their infants. Nurses can create similar Internet interventions for the purpose of providing social support to mothers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of the New Mothers Network on Single, Low-Income, African American Mothers' Psychological, Parenting, and Health Care Utilization Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158799-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of the New Mothers Network on Single, Low-Income, African American Mothers' Psychological, Parenting, and Health Care Utilization Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brage-Hudson, Diane, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">43nd &amp; Emile, Omaha, NE, 68198, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">720-898-4831</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dbrage@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D. Brage-Hudson, C. Campbell-Grossman, M. Hertzog, R. Keating-Lefler, , University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services (2007), 69% of African American births are to single mothers. Almost 40% (5.4 million) of these mothers live below the poverty level (DeNavas-Walt, Proctor, &amp; Smith, 2008). The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects on an Internet-based intervention, the New Mothers Network (NMN), on single, low-income, African American mothers' psychological, parenting, and health care utilization outcomes. Theoretical Framework: The study was based on social support theory (House, 1981). Social support included psychological and informational resources for mothers through the NMN and through their relationships with nurses and other mothers who were electronically connected. Methodology: Mothers were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the NMN Intervention Group or the Control Group in this longitudinal study. For participants in the Intervention Group, MSNTV was installed in subjects' homes and connected to the Internet. Data were collected at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months following the infant's birth. Analysis: Data were analyzed using a linear mixed model, repeated-measures ANOVA, and chi-square tests. Results: Although viewed with caution due to the small sample size, reported self esteem (p&lt;.05) and loneliness (p=.06) were significant in some analyses. For infant health services utilized, 70.6% (n=12) of those in the usual care group took their infant to the emergency room at least once during the study compared to 35.7% (n=5) of the mothers receiving the intervention X2 (1, N=31) = 4.01 (p=.05). Intervention revisions and futher focus on monitoring health care services will be presented in future studies. Nursing Implications: The NMN allowed mothers to share their experiences and acquire information from nurses about caring for themselves and their infants. Nurses can create similar Internet interventions for the purpose of providing social support to mothers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:24:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:24:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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