2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158803
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older adults’ ethical issues regarding health care
Abstract:
Older adults’ ethical issues regarding health care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Smith, Katharine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Kansas City
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2220 Holmes, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA
Contact Telephone:816.235.1724
Although moral relevance and moral conflict are common problems in bioethics, attention is rarely given to the nondramatic, everyday ethics of health care. This ANF funded study was significant because it was the first to investigate these everyday moral issues from the perspective of older adult health care consumers. The overall goals of this descriptive study were to pilot interview questions and study design, as well as collect preliminary data about the ethical issues older adults encounter regarding health care. The sample of ten participants answered several open-ended questions in an audiotaped interview; the tape was subsequently transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis methods. Although two of the open-ended questions were effective in eliciting ethically related health care issues, the addition of specific examples to those questions was suggested. Health care related ethical issues identified by the older adults were: Attentiveness (Commitment and Technique), Respect (Preferences, Time, and Dignity), Care (Competency, Adequacy, Necessity, and Accountability), Finances (Coverage and Hassles), and Health Care Systems (Bottom Line, Quality, Public Relations, and Billing Practices). The highest priority issues for participants were in the Attentiveness and Respect categories, and the effects of these ethical issues were emotional, physical, and financial in nature.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder adults’ ethical issues regarding health careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158803-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older adults&rsquo; ethical issues regarding health care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Katharine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Kansas City</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2220 Holmes, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">816.235.1724</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smithkv@umkc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although moral relevance and moral conflict are common problems in bioethics, attention is rarely given to the nondramatic, everyday ethics of health care. This ANF funded study was significant because it was the first to investigate these everyday moral issues from the perspective of older adult health care consumers. The overall goals of this descriptive study were to pilot interview questions and study design, as well as collect preliminary data about the ethical issues older adults encounter regarding health care. The sample of ten participants answered several open-ended questions in an audiotaped interview; the tape was subsequently transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis methods. Although two of the open-ended questions were effective in eliciting ethically related health care issues, the addition of specific examples to those questions was suggested. Health care related ethical issues identified by the older adults were: Attentiveness (Commitment and Technique), Respect (Preferences, Time, and Dignity), Care (Competency, Adequacy, Necessity, and Accountability), Finances (Coverage and Hassles), and Health Care Systems (Bottom Line, Quality, Public Relations, and Billing Practices). The highest priority issues for participants were in the Attentiveness and Respect categories, and the effects of these ethical issues were emotional, physical, and financial in nature.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:24:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:24:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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