2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158808
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An asthma intervention program with African-American inner-city school children
Abstract:
An asthma intervention program with African-American inner-city school children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA
Contact Telephone:773.508.3265
Asthma is a chronic illness that affects 5-10% or 5 million children in the U.S. Morbidity and rising mortality rates are of particular concern in minority children. This study addresses a serious knowledge deficit regarding the management of asthma in minority children by testing the effects of a school-based asthma intervention program on the knowledge, self-efficacy, self-care and self-esteem of 8-12 year old inner city students. The intervention consisted of participation in an asthma intervention program that included educational sessions followed by 5 monthly visits with a nurse practitioner. During these visits the child's respiratory status was assessed, educational content was re-enforced and changes could be made to the management plan. Data from 52 students from 4 schools with school based clinics were obtained using self-report and health outcome measures. Students in the intervention program scored significantly higher than a control group on asthma knowledge and self-care practice measures at both the 5 and 12 month pottest times. Peak flow readings for the treatment group were also higher than the control group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn asthma intervention program with African-American inner-city school childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158808-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An asthma intervention program with African-American inner-city school children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">773.508.3265</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bvelsor@luc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Asthma is a chronic illness that affects 5-10% or 5 million children in the U.S. Morbidity and rising mortality rates are of particular concern in minority children. This study addresses a serious knowledge deficit regarding the management of asthma in minority children by testing the effects of a school-based asthma intervention program on the knowledge, self-efficacy, self-care and self-esteem of 8-12 year old inner city students. The intervention consisted of participation in an asthma intervention program that included educational sessions followed by 5 monthly visits with a nurse practitioner. During these visits the child's respiratory status was assessed, educational content was re-enforced and changes could be made to the management plan. Data from 52 students from 4 schools with school based clinics were obtained using self-report and health outcome measures. Students in the intervention program scored significantly higher than a control group on asthma knowledge and self-care practice measures at both the 5 and 12 month pottest times. Peak flow readings for the treatment group were also higher than the control group.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:25:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:25:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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