Long-term physical and mental health consequences of intimate partner violence for women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158814
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Long-term physical and mental health consequences of intimate partner violence for women
Abstract:
Long-term physical and mental health consequences of intimate partner violence for women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Woods, Stephanie
P.I. Institution Name:College of Nursing, University of Akron
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, Ohio, 44325, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.7854
While the depression and increased stress women experience in intimate abusive relationships are well-documented, there is little research examining the long-term physical and psychosocial effects of abuse for women who have left the battering relationship. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the long-term physical and mental health consequences of intimate partner violence for women. The purposive sample consisted of 105 ethnically diverse women, aged 37.72 (SD 11.13) years, who had been out of an intimate abusive relationship an average of 8 years (SD 6.55 years). Participants completed measures of intimate abuse, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in this descriptive-correlational study. Fifty of the women also completed a physical health problems survey. Almost 47% of the post-abused women were currently experiencing mild, moderate, or severe PTSD symptomatology. There were significant relationships between intimate physical and emotional abuse and PTSD symptoms, r=.23 and .21, p values < .05, respectively. Fifty-two percent of the women were experiencing depressive symptoms. There were also significant differences in physical health before, during, and after leaving the abusive relationship for the subgroup of post-abused women completing the physical health problems survey. Implications for health professionals caring for women will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLong-term physical and mental health consequences of intimate partner violence for womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158814-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Long-term physical and mental health consequences of intimate partner violence for women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Woods, Stephanie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, Ohio, 44325, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.7854</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">SW5@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While the depression and increased stress women experience in intimate abusive relationships are well-documented, there is little research examining the long-term physical and psychosocial effects of abuse for women who have left the battering relationship. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the long-term physical and mental health consequences of intimate partner violence for women. The purposive sample consisted of 105 ethnically diverse women, aged 37.72 (SD 11.13) years, who had been out of an intimate abusive relationship an average of 8 years (SD 6.55 years). Participants completed measures of intimate abuse, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in this descriptive-correlational study. Fifty of the women also completed a physical health problems survey. Almost 47% of the post-abused women were currently experiencing mild, moderate, or severe PTSD symptomatology. There were significant relationships between intimate physical and emotional abuse and PTSD symptoms, r=.23 and .21, p values &lt; .05, respectively. Fifty-two percent of the women were experiencing depressive symptoms. There were also significant differences in physical health before, during, and after leaving the abusive relationship for the subgroup of post-abused women completing the physical health problems survey. Implications for health professionals caring for women will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:25:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:25:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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