2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158815
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Function and Symptom Distress in Women Treated for Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Cognitive Function and Symptom Distress in Women Treated for Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Cimprich, Bernadine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, #2172, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.0193
Effective cognitive functioning supports recovery and adjustment when dealing with a life-threatening illness such as breast cancer. Symptom distress associated with breast cancer treatment may have a detrimental effect on cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to examine:1) the pattern of changes in cognitive functioning and symptom distress from the pre-treatment period to nine months following breast cancer surgery; and 2) the relationship between cognitive functioning and symptom distress over time. A theory of fatigue of directed attention in life-threatening illness is the basis for this study. Fifty one women newly diagnosed with early stage breast cancer, ranging in age from 35 to 86 years, were assessed with repeated measures at five time points: pre-treatment and post surgery at two weeks and 3, 6, and 9 months. The measures included the Attentional Function Index (AFI) to assess perceived effectiveness in cognitive function and the Symptom Distress Scale (SDS). Participants reported reduced effectiveness in cognitive function and moderate levels of symptom distress prior to any treatment. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated that AFI mean scores did not change significantly over time. There was a gradual but significant (p<.05) improvement in SDS mean scores over time. Multiple regression analyses indicated that symptom distress accounted for a significant (p<.05) portion of the variance (46%) in perceived cognitive functioning at nine months after surgery, even after controlling for type of treatment. The findings indicate that reduced effectiveness in cognitive function and symptom distress can persist over an extended period in women treated for breast cancer. Further, unrelieved symptom distress is associated with poorer cognitive function. Nursing interventions to reduce symptom distress and restore effective cognitive functioning are needed from the earliest contact in women treated for breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Function and Symptom Distress in Women Treated for Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158815-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Function and Symptom Distress in Women Treated for Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cimprich, Bernadine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, #2172, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.0193</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cimprich@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Effective cognitive functioning supports recovery and adjustment when dealing with a life-threatening illness such as breast cancer. Symptom distress associated with breast cancer treatment may have a detrimental effect on cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to examine:1) the pattern of changes in cognitive functioning and symptom distress from the pre-treatment period to nine months following breast cancer surgery; and 2) the relationship between cognitive functioning and symptom distress over time. A theory of fatigue of directed attention in life-threatening illness is the basis for this study. Fifty one women newly diagnosed with early stage breast cancer, ranging in age from 35 to 86 years, were assessed with repeated measures at five time points: pre-treatment and post surgery at two weeks and 3, 6, and 9 months. The measures included the Attentional Function Index (AFI) to assess perceived effectiveness in cognitive function and the Symptom Distress Scale (SDS). Participants reported reduced effectiveness in cognitive function and moderate levels of symptom distress prior to any treatment. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated that AFI mean scores did not change significantly over time. There was a gradual but significant (p&lt;.05) improvement in SDS mean scores over time. Multiple regression analyses indicated that symptom distress accounted for a significant (p&lt;.05) portion of the variance (46%) in perceived cognitive functioning at nine months after surgery, even after controlling for type of treatment. The findings indicate that reduced effectiveness in cognitive function and symptom distress can persist over an extended period in women treated for breast cancer. Further, unrelieved symptom distress is associated with poorer cognitive function. Nursing interventions to reduce symptom distress and restore effective cognitive functioning are needed from the earliest contact in women treated for breast cancer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:25:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:25:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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