Osteoporosis Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Osteoporosis Prevention Behaviors between Men and Women in Higher Age Risk Groups

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158816
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Osteoporosis Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Osteoporosis Prevention Behaviors between Men and Women in Higher Age Risk Groups
Abstract:
Osteoporosis Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Osteoporosis Prevention Behaviors between Men and Women in Higher Age Risk Groups
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Doheny, Margaret, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:330.672.3686
Osteoporosis is a debilitating loss of bone mass affecting women and men. Approximately 28 million people in the United States suffer from osteoporosis or low bone density and annually, 90% of more than 250,000 hip fractures are due to osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to compare osteoporosis knowledge, health beliefs, and osteoporosis prevention behaviors in men 65 to 75 years of age and in women ages 55 to 65. The Health Belief Model and Self-Efficacy Theory provided the theoretical framework for the study. The research questions were 1) Is there a difference in knowledge of osteoporosis between men and women in higher age risk groups for osteoporosis? 2) Is there a difference in health beliefs variables between men and women in higher age risk groups for osteoporosis? 3) Is there a difference in osteoporosis preventing behaviors reported by men and women in higher age risk groups for osteoporosis? Using a descriptive methodology a community based convenience sample of 80 men and 86 women were recruited and asked to complete a questionnaire comprised of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test (OKT), Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale (OHBS), Osteoporosis Self Efficacy Scale (OSES) (Kim, Horan, & Gendler, 1991), and the Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors Survey (OPBS) (Doheny & Sedlak, 1995). Outcomes of the study revealed men had lower knowledge of osteoporosis than women, women scored significantly higher in health motivation (p<.01). An interesting finding was that men had higher dietary calcium intake than women and women had higher calcium supplement intake but calcium intake did not differ significantly and did not meet daily minimum requirements for calcium intake for both groups. These outcomes may assist health care providers in the development of more effective interventions to increase osteoporosis preventing behaviors in men and women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOsteoporosis Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Osteoporosis Prevention Behaviors between Men and Women in Higher Age Risk Groupsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158816-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Osteoporosis Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Osteoporosis Prevention Behaviors between Men and Women in Higher Age Risk Groups</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doheny, Margaret, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.672.3686</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pdoheny@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Osteoporosis is a debilitating loss of bone mass affecting women and men. Approximately 28 million people in the United States suffer from osteoporosis or low bone density and annually, 90% of more than 250,000 hip fractures are due to osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to compare osteoporosis knowledge, health beliefs, and osteoporosis prevention behaviors in men 65 to 75 years of age and in women ages 55 to 65. The Health Belief Model and Self-Efficacy Theory provided the theoretical framework for the study. The research questions were 1) Is there a difference in knowledge of osteoporosis between men and women in higher age risk groups for osteoporosis? 2) Is there a difference in health beliefs variables between men and women in higher age risk groups for osteoporosis? 3) Is there a difference in osteoporosis preventing behaviors reported by men and women in higher age risk groups for osteoporosis? Using a descriptive methodology a community based convenience sample of 80 men and 86 women were recruited and asked to complete a questionnaire comprised of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test (OKT), Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale (OHBS), Osteoporosis Self Efficacy Scale (OSES) (Kim, Horan, &amp; Gendler, 1991), and the Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors Survey (OPBS) (Doheny &amp; Sedlak, 1995). Outcomes of the study revealed men had lower knowledge of osteoporosis than women, women scored significantly higher in health motivation (p&lt;.01). An interesting finding was that men had higher dietary calcium intake than women and women had higher calcium supplement intake but calcium intake did not differ significantly and did not meet daily minimum requirements for calcium intake for both groups. These outcomes may assist health care providers in the development of more effective interventions to increase osteoporosis preventing behaviors in men and women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:25:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:25:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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