Comparison of U.S., Canadian, and Australian Subjects on the Algase Wandering Scale (Version 2)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158818
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of U.S., Canadian, and Australian Subjects on the Algase Wandering Scale (Version 2)
Abstract:
Comparison of U.S., Canadian, and Australian Subjects on the Algase Wandering Scale (Version 2)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Song, Jun-Ah
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 2160 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.936.9792
Wandering behavior of persons with dementia has been noted in many cultures. However, cross-cultural comparisons have not been reported. This study examined wandering behavior in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCs) in three English-speaking countries (U.S., Canada & Australia) using the Algase Wandering Scale-V2. The U.S. sample (n=110) was screened from randomly-selected LTCs. In both Canada and Australian, subjects (n=42 and 20 respectively) were screened from one facility chosen for convenience. Subjects did not differ significantly with regard to sex by country distribution. However, U.S subjects were significantly (F=6.236; p=.002) older (mean=85.9 years) as compared to Canadians (82.76) and Australians (80.95). Medical diagnosis was also significantly associated with country (Chi-Square=70.2; P < .0001); 97% of Canadians had Alzheimer's disease (compared to 48% U.S. and 30% Australians); 65% of Australians had an umbrella diagnosis, e.g., senile dementia, compared to 14% of U.S and none of the Canadians. AWS-V2 ratings made by two samples of indigenous staff were examined for AWS-V2 overall and its subscales. Using one-way ANOVA, significant differences were found in the AWS-V2 and three subscales (navigational deficits, eloping behavior, attention shifting) but not for persistent walking and shadowing in both rater samples. Canadians consistently reported lower ratings than U.S. and Australian raters where differences were significant; U.S. and Australian ratings differed only for navigational deficits (Australian ratings were highest among all three countries). Post-hoc analyses of subject characteristics failed to reveal consistent differences on the AWS-V2 by medical diagnosis or age. Post-hoc analyses of rater characteristics revealed significant differences by staff classification. Lower nurse aids' ratings (F=8.225; p=.000) may account for differences in the Canadian sample.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of U.S., Canadian, and Australian Subjects on the Algase Wandering Scale (Version 2)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158818-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of U.S., Canadian, and Australian Subjects on the Algase Wandering Scale (Version 2)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Song, Jun-Ah</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 2160 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.936.9792</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">junah@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Wandering behavior of persons with dementia has been noted in many cultures. However, cross-cultural comparisons have not been reported. This study examined wandering behavior in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCs) in three English-speaking countries (U.S., Canada &amp; Australia) using the Algase Wandering Scale-V2. The U.S. sample (n=110) was screened from randomly-selected LTCs. In both Canada and Australian, subjects (n=42 and 20 respectively) were screened from one facility chosen for convenience. Subjects did not differ significantly with regard to sex by country distribution. However, U.S subjects were significantly (F=6.236; p=.002) older (mean=85.9 years) as compared to Canadians (82.76) and Australians (80.95). Medical diagnosis was also significantly associated with country (Chi-Square=70.2; P &lt; .0001); 97% of Canadians had Alzheimer's disease (compared to 48% U.S. and 30% Australians); 65% of Australians had an umbrella diagnosis, e.g., senile dementia, compared to 14% of U.S and none of the Canadians. AWS-V2 ratings made by two samples of indigenous staff were examined for AWS-V2 overall and its subscales. Using one-way ANOVA, significant differences were found in the AWS-V2 and three subscales (navigational deficits, eloping behavior, attention shifting) but not for persistent walking and shadowing in both rater samples. Canadians consistently reported lower ratings than U.S. and Australian raters where differences were significant; U.S. and Australian ratings differed only for navigational deficits (Australian ratings were highest among all three countries). Post-hoc analyses of subject characteristics failed to reveal consistent differences on the AWS-V2 by medical diagnosis or age. Post-hoc analyses of rater characteristics revealed significant differences by staff classification. Lower nurse aids' ratings (F=8.225; p=.000) may account for differences in the Canadian sample.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:25:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:25:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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