Efficacy of Computer-Tailoring for Hearing Health Promotion with Construction Workers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158819
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of Computer-Tailoring for Hearing Health Promotion with Construction Workers
Abstract:
Efficacy of Computer-Tailoring for Hearing Health Promotion with Construction Workers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Kerr, Madeleine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612.625.2669
This study compared the efficacy of tailored and non-tailored messages on construction workers' hearing health behavior. Two versions of a computer-based training program (CBT) based on the Health Promotion Model were designed to test the effectiveness of individually tailored and non-tailored messages on use of hearing protection devices (HPD). In addition, the effect of an informational booster one month after CBT was examined. A sample of 343 construction workers participated in two CBT sessions approximately one year apart. The CBT randomized participants to tailored/non-tailored and booster/no booster conditions. Data were collected electronically while participants responded to a survey as part of the CBT. Overall, participants reported improved use of HPD at time 2 (p < .001); the median reported use of HPD was 42% at time 1, improving to 50% at time 2. Both tailored and non-tailored CBT appear to be effective in improving construction workers' hearing health behavior. On average, tailored participants improved use of HPD by 8.3 % (s.d.=30.2) while those receiving non-tailored messages improved use of HPD by 6.1% (s.d.=29.8) (p=.51). Those that received a booster improved 9.5% (28.9), those who did not 5.6%(30.6), (p=.24). Using multiple regression, 58% of the variance in post-intervention use of hearing protection was explained by 3 variables: baseline use of hearing protection, social models of use of HPD (e.g. having supervisors and coworkers who use HPD) and benefits minus barriers (perceived benefits outweigh the barriers to using HPD). These findings can be used to plan revisions of the CBT.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of Computer-Tailoring for Hearing Health Promotion with Construction Workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158819-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Efficacy of Computer-Tailoring for Hearing Health Promotion with Construction Workers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kerr, Madeleine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612.625.2669</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kerrx010@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study compared the efficacy of tailored and non-tailored messages on construction workers' hearing health behavior. Two versions of a computer-based training program (CBT) based on the Health Promotion Model were designed to test the effectiveness of individually tailored and non-tailored messages on use of hearing protection devices (HPD). In addition, the effect of an informational booster one month after CBT was examined. A sample of 343 construction workers participated in two CBT sessions approximately one year apart. The CBT randomized participants to tailored/non-tailored and booster/no booster conditions. Data were collected electronically while participants responded to a survey as part of the CBT. Overall, participants reported improved use of HPD at time 2 (p &lt; .001); the median reported use of HPD was 42% at time 1, improving to 50% at time 2. Both tailored and non-tailored CBT appear to be effective in improving construction workers' hearing health behavior. On average, tailored participants improved use of HPD by 8.3 % (s.d.=30.2) while those receiving non-tailored messages improved use of HPD by 6.1% (s.d.=29.8) (p=.51). Those that received a booster improved 9.5% (28.9), those who did not 5.6%(30.6), (p=.24). Using multiple regression, 58% of the variance in post-intervention use of hearing protection was explained by 3 variables: baseline use of hearing protection, social models of use of HPD (e.g. having supervisors and coworkers who use HPD) and benefits minus barriers (perceived benefits outweigh the barriers to using HPD). These findings can be used to plan revisions of the CBT.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:25:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:25:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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