Nurses Clinical Interventions during Labor and Professional Beliefs about Their Ability to Affect the Rate of Cesarean Birth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158820
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses Clinical Interventions during Labor and Professional Beliefs about Their Ability to Affect the Rate of Cesarean Birth
Abstract:
Nurses Clinical Interventions during Labor and Professional Beliefs about Their Ability to Affect the Rate of Cesarean Birth
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:James, Dotti, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314.577.8953
The Cesarean birth (C/Birth) rate in the United States increased in 1997, the first increase since 1989. A C/Birth is associated with increased maternal morbidity and healthcare costs. The most common reasons for primary C/Birth are dystocia and nonreassuring fetal status. Perinatal nurses provide interventions during labor to minimize the risk of these conditions. Limited data exist about how registered nurses (RNs) perceive their role and what clinical interventions RNs intuitively believe work best. The purpose of this study was to evaluate RNs' professional beliefs about their nursing interventions on the C/Birth rate. Multiple focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with experienced perinatal RNs and obstetricians at the labor-delivery-recovery units of hospitals in three Midwestern cities. Physician input was solicited at these hospitals to obtain additional perspectives of current practice. The process will be repeated using the data and reactions from the first round of nurse and physician discussions as the basis for eliciting responses from the other groups and provide a better understanding of the professional nurses' beliefs guiding their nursing interventions and the physicians' recognition of these significant interventions. The data was analyzed for trends and themes about nurses' beliefs and clinical interventions affecting the risk of C/Birth. Seven themes guiding nursing interventions emerged from the transcript analysis of the nurses' focus groups and these mirrored the work of Patricia Benner about progression from novice to expert nurse. Four themes about nursing care were identified from physician data. Nurse-physician communication patterns were identified as a significant variable in labor management. These communication techniques are utilized to elicit specific responses and actions during the labor process. An increased understanding of the intuitive nursing interventions of expert nurses contributes to knowledge about intuitive nursing interventions and can be used to develop educational programs and intrapartum nursing orientation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses Clinical Interventions during Labor and Professional Beliefs about Their Ability to Affect the Rate of Cesarean Birthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158820-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses Clinical Interventions during Labor and Professional Beliefs about Their Ability to Affect the Rate of Cesarean Birth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">James, Dotti, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314.577.8953</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jamesdc@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Cesarean birth (C/Birth) rate in the United States increased in 1997, the first increase since 1989. A C/Birth is associated with increased maternal morbidity and healthcare costs. The most common reasons for primary C/Birth are dystocia and nonreassuring fetal status. Perinatal nurses provide interventions during labor to minimize the risk of these conditions. Limited data exist about how registered nurses (RNs) perceive their role and what clinical interventions RNs intuitively believe work best. The purpose of this study was to evaluate RNs' professional beliefs about their nursing interventions on the C/Birth rate. Multiple focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with experienced perinatal RNs and obstetricians at the labor-delivery-recovery units of hospitals in three Midwestern cities. Physician input was solicited at these hospitals to obtain additional perspectives of current practice. The process will be repeated using the data and reactions from the first round of nurse and physician discussions as the basis for eliciting responses from the other groups and provide a better understanding of the professional nurses' beliefs guiding their nursing interventions and the physicians' recognition of these significant interventions. The data was analyzed for trends and themes about nurses' beliefs and clinical interventions affecting the risk of C/Birth. Seven themes guiding nursing interventions emerged from the transcript analysis of the nurses' focus groups and these mirrored the work of Patricia Benner about progression from novice to expert nurse. Four themes about nursing care were identified from physician data. Nurse-physician communication patterns were identified as a significant variable in labor management. These communication techniques are utilized to elicit specific responses and actions during the labor process. An increased understanding of the intuitive nursing interventions of expert nurses contributes to knowledge about intuitive nursing interventions and can be used to develop educational programs and intrapartum nursing orientation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:25:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:25:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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