2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158821
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health of Women Who Dropped from Sight When Welfare Became Workfare
Abstract:
Health of Women Who Dropped from Sight When Welfare Became Workfare
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Hildebrandt, Eugenie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 529, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414.229.5464
Poor women who are single heads of households often depend on assistance programs to survive. When U. S. welfare reform policy replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) with Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the new work expectations had a significant impact on family life and health. The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive study was to explore the health status and personal and system barriers of marginalized women who were unable to manage health, family, and work within their lives and environments. The sample was 30 women from an urban area who did not attempt or were unsuccessful in the Wisconsin's work-fare program (W-2) for reasons that included education deficits, poverty, language barriers, substance misuse, ill health, race, gender or social bias or living in high risk environments. The primary health care principle of community participation was the framework for this multi-methodological study. Instruments included a demographic profile, a semi-structured interview guide and the U.S. Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HANES) General Well being (GWB) Schedule. Interviews were approximately one hour long and were audio taped. They were then transcribed and entered into NVIVO software to facilitate analysis. Quantitative and qualitative were sorted by the categories of the HANES GWB Schedule: anxiety, depression, general health, positive well being, self-control and vitality. System and personal health barriers were identified from the data that had health-damaging potential because they exceeded the response capacity of many individuals. Personal strengths were also identified that participants could use to mitigate the effects of W-2. These findings can inform health care providers and policy makers and encourage collaboration among them for making appropriate changes in Work-based Welfare policy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth of Women Who Dropped from Sight When Welfare Became Workfareen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158821-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health of Women Who Dropped from Sight When Welfare Became Workfare</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hildebrandt, Eugenie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 529, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414.229.5464</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hbrandt@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Poor women who are single heads of households often depend on assistance programs to survive. When U. S. welfare reform policy replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) with Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the new work expectations had a significant impact on family life and health. The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive study was to explore the health status and personal and system barriers of marginalized women who were unable to manage health, family, and work within their lives and environments. The sample was 30 women from an urban area who did not attempt or were unsuccessful in the Wisconsin's work-fare program (W-2) for reasons that included education deficits, poverty, language barriers, substance misuse, ill health, race, gender or social bias or living in high risk environments. The primary health care principle of community participation was the framework for this multi-methodological study. Instruments included a demographic profile, a semi-structured interview guide and the U.S. Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HANES) General Well being (GWB) Schedule. Interviews were approximately one hour long and were audio taped. They were then transcribed and entered into NVIVO software to facilitate analysis. Quantitative and qualitative were sorted by the categories of the HANES GWB Schedule: anxiety, depression, general health, positive well being, self-control and vitality. System and personal health barriers were identified from the data that had health-damaging potential because they exceeded the response capacity of many individuals. Personal strengths were also identified that participants could use to mitigate the effects of W-2. These findings can inform health care providers and policy makers and encourage collaboration among them for making appropriate changes in Work-based Welfare policy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:25:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:25:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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