2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158823
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assaults against Nursing Assistants
Abstract:
Assaults against Nursing Assistants
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Gates, Donna
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513.558.3793
Increasing violence against healthcare workers prompted OSHA to publish guidelines in 1996 regarding the actions employers must take to protect their employees from violence. At greatest risk for non-fatal assault is the nursing assistant working in long-term care. The aims of this study were to measure the incidence of assaults against nursing assistants (NAs) from residents and describe the context in which the assaults occur. Data were collected as part of a large trial testing an intervention to reduce violence. In the six nursing homes randomly selected as study sites, 138 subjects volunteered to participate. Each NA carried an Assault Log for 80 hours of work and recorded the following information when an assault occurred: 1) number of residents assigned, 2) diagnosis of resident who assaulted, 3) type of assault, 4) caregiving activity being performed when assaulted, and 5) whether an injury occurred. Current findings include the following: 1) total number of assaults was 624, 2) mean number of assaults was 4.69 with a range of 0 - 67, 3) number of NAs with no assaults was 39 (29%), and 4) mean number of assaults for those NAs with at least 1 assault (N=94) was 6.64. Of the 624 assaults, 51% included hitting or punching and 40% included grabbing, pinching, or pulling hair. Of the 624 assaults, 43% occurred during dressing or changing and 26% during turning or transferring. Ongoing data analysis will determine whether the following variables are related to the incidence of assaults: 1) characteristics of the NA, 2) characteristics of the resident, and 3) staffing ratios. This study has implications regarding the health and safety for both the NAs and residents and demonstrates the need for violence prevention programs in nursing homes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssaults against Nursing Assistantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158823-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assaults against Nursing Assistants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gates, Donna</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.558.3793</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">donna.gates@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increasing violence against healthcare workers prompted OSHA to publish guidelines in 1996 regarding the actions employers must take to protect their employees from violence. At greatest risk for non-fatal assault is the nursing assistant working in long-term care. The aims of this study were to measure the incidence of assaults against nursing assistants (NAs) from residents and describe the context in which the assaults occur. Data were collected as part of a large trial testing an intervention to reduce violence. In the six nursing homes randomly selected as study sites, 138 subjects volunteered to participate. Each NA carried an Assault Log for 80 hours of work and recorded the following information when an assault occurred: 1) number of residents assigned, 2) diagnosis of resident who assaulted, 3) type of assault, 4) caregiving activity being performed when assaulted, and 5) whether an injury occurred. Current findings include the following: 1) total number of assaults was 624, 2) mean number of assaults was 4.69 with a range of 0 - 67, 3) number of NAs with no assaults was 39 (29%), and 4) mean number of assaults for those NAs with at least 1 assault (N=94) was 6.64. Of the 624 assaults, 51% included hitting or punching and 40% included grabbing, pinching, or pulling hair. Of the 624 assaults, 43% occurred during dressing or changing and 26% during turning or transferring. Ongoing data analysis will determine whether the following variables are related to the incidence of assaults: 1) characteristics of the NA, 2) characteristics of the resident, and 3) staffing ratios. This study has implications regarding the health and safety for both the NAs and residents and demonstrates the need for violence prevention programs in nursing homes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:25:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:25:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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