2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158825
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding the Language of Chronic Pain
Abstract:
Understanding the Language of Chronic Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Smith, A.
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA
Contact Telephone:419.383.5836
Chronic pain is perhaps one of the most widespread and least understood problems facing the health care delivery system and women report a higher incidence of chronic pain conditions than men. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has issued new standards for pain assessment, yet the meaning and experience of pain remains complex and subjective. Good pain management requires accurate assessment and communication. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore how women experiencing chronic pain express pain within the family and what meaning they give to the pain in their lives in order to provide insight into the complexities of chronic pain and understanding of the families' needs. Narrative ethnography was used to explore this question. The method of analysis was constant comparison according to Strauss (1977). The computer software program QSR NUD*IST was used to manage the data. Twenty-five women experiencing chronic pain and thirteen family members (7 husbands, 1 father, 1 stepmother, 4 children aged 10 to 24) participated in the study. Taped interviews were conducted using a semi-structured guide of open-ended questions. The results indicated that the women perceived the meaning of persistent pain as: 1. A loss of self and role in the family, 2. An opportunity to view themselves more reflectively, to care for themselves, and to make a spiritual connection, and 3. A universal experience to be accepted as part of being human. Some saw no meaning and reported feeling anger and resentment. Family members saw the meaning as: 1. Something was expected of them, 2. Stress and worry, and 3. A test of strength to be overcome. Expression included: 1. keeping it in, 2. indirect signs of discomfort, 3.direct verbal communication, and 4. Metaphor. Nursing implications include listening, reframing distorted thinking and illness imaging, and facilitating open communication.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding the Language of Chronic Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158825-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding the Language of Chronic Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, A.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">419.383.5836</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">asmith2@mco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Chronic pain is perhaps one of the most widespread and least understood problems facing the health care delivery system and women report a higher incidence of chronic pain conditions than men. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has issued new standards for pain assessment, yet the meaning and experience of pain remains complex and subjective. Good pain management requires accurate assessment and communication. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore how women experiencing chronic pain express pain within the family and what meaning they give to the pain in their lives in order to provide insight into the complexities of chronic pain and understanding of the families' needs. Narrative ethnography was used to explore this question. The method of analysis was constant comparison according to Strauss (1977). The computer software program QSR NUD*IST was used to manage the data. Twenty-five women experiencing chronic pain and thirteen family members (7 husbands, 1 father, 1 stepmother, 4 children aged 10 to 24) participated in the study. Taped interviews were conducted using a semi-structured guide of open-ended questions. The results indicated that the women perceived the meaning of persistent pain as: 1. A loss of self and role in the family, 2. An opportunity to view themselves more reflectively, to care for themselves, and to make a spiritual connection, and 3. A universal experience to be accepted as part of being human. Some saw no meaning and reported feeling anger and resentment. Family members saw the meaning as: 1. Something was expected of them, 2. Stress and worry, and 3. A test of strength to be overcome. Expression included: 1. keeping it in, 2. indirect signs of discomfort, 3.direct verbal communication, and 4. Metaphor. Nursing implications include listening, reframing distorted thinking and illness imaging, and facilitating open communication.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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