2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158828
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Interdialytic Weight Gain During the First Year of Hemodialysis
Abstract:
Patterns of Interdialytic Weight Gain During the First Year of Hemodialysis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Welch, Janet, DNS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 407, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317/274-8091
Co-Authors:Susan M. Perkins, PhD, Associate Professor; Cynthia S. Johnson, MA, Biostatistician; and Michael A. Kraus, MD, Associate Professor
Patients with chronic kidney failure are usually prescribed a fluid limit of 1 liter per day. Limiting fluid intake is difficult and as many as 80% of hemodialysis patients are unable or unwilling to do so. Fluid nonadherence contributes to negative outcomes such as exacerbated hypertension, pulmonary edema, and premature death. Fluid intake is indirectly assessed by interdialytic weight gain (IWG) because the anuric patient is unable to excrete ingested fluid. Longitudinal data on patterns of IWG are needed because no empirical evidence suggests the best time to deliver interventions to reduce intake. The purpose of this retrospective, descriptive study was to describe patterns in IWG over the first year of treatment as assessed by two commonly used indicators of IWG. Twenty-seven individuals participated in the study, ranging in age from 25-86 (M = 58); 56% were men and 46% were African American. A mixed model of mean daily IWG repeated within each subject was fit to obtain estimates of between- and within-subject variability. Linear and quadratic week terms were added to the model to examine change in mean daily IWG over time. Using both measures, IWG increased over the first 12 weeks of treatment, appeared to level off after 12 weeks, and increased again after 32 weeks of treatment. Holidays, season of year, and the number of days between dialysis treatments did not affect the patterns of IWG. The findings suggest that interventions to reduce fluid intake would ideally occur after an individual has been receiving treatment for 3 months and that booster interventions may be indicated after 32 weeks of treatment. Variability of the two measures suggests a need for further study to determine the best way to measure interdialytic weight gain. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Interdialytic Weight Gain During the First Year of Hemodialysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158828-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Interdialytic Weight Gain During the First Year of Hemodialysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Welch, Janet, DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 407, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317/274-8091</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jwelch@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan M. Perkins, PhD, Associate Professor; Cynthia S. Johnson, MA, Biostatistician; and Michael A. Kraus, MD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Patients with chronic kidney failure are usually prescribed a fluid limit of 1 liter per day. Limiting fluid intake is difficult and as many as 80% of hemodialysis patients are unable or unwilling to do so. Fluid nonadherence contributes to negative outcomes such as exacerbated hypertension, pulmonary edema, and premature death. Fluid intake is indirectly assessed by interdialytic weight gain (IWG) because the anuric patient is unable to excrete ingested fluid. Longitudinal data on patterns of IWG are needed because no empirical evidence suggests the best time to deliver interventions to reduce intake. The purpose of this retrospective, descriptive study was to describe patterns in IWG over the first year of treatment as assessed by two commonly used indicators of IWG. Twenty-seven individuals participated in the study, ranging in age from 25-86 (M = 58); 56% were men and 46% were African American. A mixed model of mean daily IWG repeated within each subject was fit to obtain estimates of between- and within-subject variability. Linear and quadratic week terms were added to the model to examine change in mean daily IWG over time. Using both measures, IWG increased over the first 12 weeks of treatment, appeared to level off after 12 weeks, and increased again after 32 weeks of treatment. Holidays, season of year, and the number of days between dialysis treatments did not affect the patterns of IWG. The findings suggest that interventions to reduce fluid intake would ideally occur after an individual has been receiving treatment for 3 months and that booster interventions may be indicated after 32 weeks of treatment. Variability of the two measures suggests a need for further study to determine the best way to measure interdialytic weight gain. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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