2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158830
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Clinical Nursing Information Among Eight Home Care Agencies
Abstract:
Comparison of Clinical Nursing Information Among Eight Home Care Agencies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Westra, Bonnie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON - 6-135 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN, 55434, USA
Contact Telephone:612-625-4470
Co-Authors:Karen Marek, PhD, MBA, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor
Use of a standardized framework in the documentation of health care provides valuable data related to patient care that can be collected on a routine basis. The profession of nursing has been active in the development of standardized approaches to database development. The Omaha System is one example of a standardized system of recording health care data for home health care patients and consists of the Problem Classification Scheme (nursing diagnoses), Intervention Scheme, and Problem Rating Scale for Outcomes. The purpose of this study was to compare patient problems, interventions, and outcomes classified by the Omaha System in eight different home care agencies. A total of 24,669 client's admission problems and interventions were examined. Also discharge outcome ratings for admission problems were compared. The largest number of problems identified were in the physiological domain, however type of problem identified varied by agency. In addition, the mean number of problems identified per agency ranged from 2.7 to 6.6. Intervention categories identified were different by agency and also differed by problem. Finally, expected and actual outcome ratings varied among agencies with improvement in outcome ratings occurring most frequently in the majority of agencies. The participating agencies also varied in type of payor and client served, for example one agency provided community-based long term care, while a large number of agencies provided mostly more acute Medicare home health care services. Also, agencies varied in their experience with using both the Omaha System and CareFacts, the clinical information system used by all participating agencies. Results of this study provide support for the continued collection of standardized clinical information to describe home health care practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Clinical Nursing Information Among Eight Home Care Agenciesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158830-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Clinical Nursing Information Among Eight Home Care Agencies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Westra, Bonnie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON - 6-135 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN, 55434, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-625-4470</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">westr006@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Marek, PhD, MBA, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Use of a standardized framework in the documentation of health care provides valuable data related to patient care that can be collected on a routine basis. The profession of nursing has been active in the development of standardized approaches to database development. The Omaha System is one example of a standardized system of recording health care data for home health care patients and consists of the Problem Classification Scheme (nursing diagnoses), Intervention Scheme, and Problem Rating Scale for Outcomes. The purpose of this study was to compare patient problems, interventions, and outcomes classified by the Omaha System in eight different home care agencies. A total of 24,669 client's admission problems and interventions were examined. Also discharge outcome ratings for admission problems were compared. The largest number of problems identified were in the physiological domain, however type of problem identified varied by agency. In addition, the mean number of problems identified per agency ranged from 2.7 to 6.6. Intervention categories identified were different by agency and also differed by problem. Finally, expected and actual outcome ratings varied among agencies with improvement in outcome ratings occurring most frequently in the majority of agencies. The participating agencies also varied in type of payor and client served, for example one agency provided community-based long term care, while a large number of agencies provided mostly more acute Medicare home health care services. Also, agencies varied in their experience with using both the Omaha System and CareFacts, the clinical information system used by all participating agencies. Results of this study provide support for the continued collection of standardized clinical information to describe home health care practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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