Childhood Lead Exposure: Caregivers' Knowledge, Perceptions of Risk, and Risk Reduction Behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158831
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Childhood Lead Exposure: Caregivers' Knowledge, Perceptions of Risk, and Risk Reduction Behaviors
Abstract:
Childhood Lead Exposure: Caregivers' Knowledge, Perceptions of Risk, and Risk Reduction Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:White, Kim, PhD, MS, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Public Health Nursing, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA
Contact Telephone:618-650-3495
In 2000, 9% (N = 244,442) of Illinois children tested had BLLs equal to or greater than 10 ¦g/dL; 3% had BLLs equal to or greater than 15 ¦g/dL; & 207 had levels equal to or greater than 45 ¦g/dL. The purpose of this study was to determine the needs of caregivers of children 6 years & younger regarding lead poisoning & prevention education. The Integrated Environmental Health Model was used as a guide. Caregivers' lead knowledge, perceptions of risks, & risk reduction behaviors were assessed using a 43-item questionnaire. The relative influence of caregiver's age, educational level, gender, rural vs. urban residence, receipt of lead poisoning information on lead knowledge, perceptions of risk, & risk reduction behaviors were evaluated. Caregivers (N=350) were recruited in areas high risk for lead exposure. Caregivers had knowledge about where lead is found & its effect on children's learning ability. A deficit existed in knowledge about transmission of lead, & risk reduction behaviors. Caregivers, male, older, more educated, with higher income, more children, or who accessed more sources of lead information had higher lead knowledge scores. Low perceptions of lead poisoning risks in their areas & for their children existed. No caregivers performed all the listed behaviors routinely. The more sources of lead information, the greater the perceptions of risk & the more risk reduction behaviors performed. Caregivers with higher incomes & educational levels were less likely to perform risk reduction activities. All caregivers should be educated about lead. Ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of lead education programs is needed. Nurses must advocate for lead abatement & for policy change so that all children within the at-risk age groups are tested. Client histories should include an assessment of environmental risks. Further research is needed to evaluate whether caregivers are receiving lead information, if the information is accurate & effective, their perceptions of risk, & risk reduction behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildhood Lead Exposure: Caregivers' Knowledge, Perceptions of Risk, and Risk Reduction Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158831-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Childhood Lead Exposure: Caregivers' Knowledge, Perceptions of Risk, and Risk Reduction Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White, Kim, PhD, MS, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Public Health Nursing, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618-650-3495</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kiwhite@siue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In 2000, 9% (N = 244,442) of Illinois children tested had BLLs equal to or greater than 10 &brvbar;g/dL; 3% had BLLs equal to or greater than 15 &brvbar;g/dL; &amp; 207 had levels equal to or greater than 45 &brvbar;g/dL. The purpose of this study was to determine the needs of caregivers of children 6 years &amp; younger regarding lead poisoning &amp; prevention education. The Integrated Environmental Health Model was used as a guide. Caregivers' lead knowledge, perceptions of risks, &amp; risk reduction behaviors were assessed using a 43-item questionnaire. The relative influence of caregiver's age, educational level, gender, rural vs. urban residence, receipt of lead poisoning information on lead knowledge, perceptions of risk, &amp; risk reduction behaviors were evaluated. Caregivers (N=350) were recruited in areas high risk for lead exposure. Caregivers had knowledge about where lead is found &amp; its effect on children's learning ability. A deficit existed in knowledge about transmission of lead, &amp; risk reduction behaviors. Caregivers, male, older, more educated, with higher income, more children, or who accessed more sources of lead information had higher lead knowledge scores. Low perceptions of lead poisoning risks in their areas &amp; for their children existed. No caregivers performed all the listed behaviors routinely. The more sources of lead information, the greater the perceptions of risk &amp; the more risk reduction behaviors performed. Caregivers with higher incomes &amp; educational levels were less likely to perform risk reduction activities. All caregivers should be educated about lead. Ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of lead education programs is needed. Nurses must advocate for lead abatement &amp; for policy change so that all children within the at-risk age groups are tested. Client histories should include an assessment of environmental risks. Further research is needed to evaluate whether caregivers are receiving lead information, if the information is accurate &amp; effective, their perceptions of risk, &amp; risk reduction behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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