2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158832
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying Adolescents' Perceptions Toward Smoking
Abstract:
Identifying Adolescents' Perceptions Toward Smoking
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Wider, Lottchen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Maryville University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 13550 Conway Road, St. Louis, MO, 63122, USA
Contact Telephone:314-529-9219
Co-Authors:Deborah Fritz, PhD, Associate Professor
Currently, 22.9 percent of high school students and 10.1 percent of middle school students smoke. These figures are disturbing since nine out of ten adult smokers report having smoked before 18 years of age. Consequently, investigators have developed programs designed to promote adolescent smoking prevention and cessation. Unfortunately, some of these programs have had limited success largely due to substantive methodological problems including small, unrepresentative samples, reliance on self report data, and limited use of control groups. These gaps in the descriptive and analytic research are partly attributed to a failure to understand the multiple causal factors associated with adolescent smoking. Suspicion that adolescent smoke related behavior is influenced by adolescent perception of smoking prompted this analysis. The purpose of this study was to describe adolescents' perceptions of smoking. A secondary data analysis was conducted using data that were originally collected to determine the efficacy of a computerized smoking cessation program. The sample of 63 adolescent smokers (50.8% male; 49.2% female) reported their perceptions toward smoking. Respondents were not concerned about their future health (71.4%) despite having known tobacco contains 43 carcinogens (79.0%). This finding is likely due to the perception that most (73.0%) did not think they were addicted to nicotine. Yet, 87.1% of the respondents knew that nicotine is as addictive as heroin or cocaine. The vast majority (82.3%) of the respondents planned on quitting. Reasons for smoking included being upset (82.5%), tense, worried, or angry (88.3%). Since few (13%) gender specific differences were found among adolescents' perceptions toward smoking, it may not be necessary to design gender specific adolescent smoking cessation programs. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying Adolescents' Perceptions Toward Smokingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158832-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identifying Adolescents' Perceptions Toward Smoking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wider, Lottchen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Maryville University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 13550 Conway Road, St. Louis, MO, 63122, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-529-9219</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lwider@maryville.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Fritz, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Currently, 22.9 percent of high school students and 10.1 percent of middle school students smoke. These figures are disturbing since nine out of ten adult smokers report having smoked before 18 years of age. Consequently, investigators have developed programs designed to promote adolescent smoking prevention and cessation. Unfortunately, some of these programs have had limited success largely due to substantive methodological problems including small, unrepresentative samples, reliance on self report data, and limited use of control groups. These gaps in the descriptive and analytic research are partly attributed to a failure to understand the multiple causal factors associated with adolescent smoking. Suspicion that adolescent smoke related behavior is influenced by adolescent perception of smoking prompted this analysis. The purpose of this study was to describe adolescents' perceptions of smoking. A secondary data analysis was conducted using data that were originally collected to determine the efficacy of a computerized smoking cessation program. The sample of 63 adolescent smokers (50.8% male; 49.2% female) reported their perceptions toward smoking. Respondents were not concerned about their future health (71.4%) despite having known tobacco contains 43 carcinogens (79.0%). This finding is likely due to the perception that most (73.0%) did not think they were addicted to nicotine. Yet, 87.1% of the respondents knew that nicotine is as addictive as heroin or cocaine. The vast majority (82.3%) of the respondents planned on quitting. Reasons for smoking included being upset (82.5%), tense, worried, or angry (88.3%). Since few (13%) gender specific differences were found among adolescents' perceptions toward smoking, it may not be necessary to design gender specific adolescent smoking cessation programs. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.