2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158833
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Race Differences in Report of Cancer Pain: Real or Artifact
Abstract:
Race Differences in Report of Cancer Pain: Real or Artifact
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Wilkie, Diana, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 S Damen Ave. (MC 802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-413-5469
Co-Authors:Young Ok Kim, DrPH, RN, Research Analyst; Marie Suarez, PhD, Project Director; Lauren Richie, MA, Research Assistant; and Hilary Lee, BA, Research Assistant
Aim: Insufficient data are available to support cultural sensitivity of existing, multidimensional pain instruments. The study aim was to compare race effects for a computerized pain instrument, PAINReportIt, an extension of the well-validated and reliable McGill Pain Questionnaire. Examination of racial differences will facilitate instrument revisions and lead to measurement tools that could have potential to reduce disparities known to exist in pain management. Method: Using a matched case design with subjects recruited for studies in Seattle and Chicago, baseline PAINReportIt« data were compared for 31 African American (AA) (61% women, mean age 58 +15 yrs) and 31 Caucasian (C) (61% women, mean age 54 +13 yrs) cancer patients, matched on cancer type, gender, and age. Computer experience and sensory pain (location, intensity, quality, pattern) scores were compared with t tests or Chi Square analysis. Results: More AA (78%) than C (35%) had never used a computer (p<.001) and had a history of poor pain relief (p<.02). Common pain experiences (toothache, headache, stomachache) were rated more intense by AA than C (p<.000). Current pain intensity scores were not different. C reported more cancer pain sites than AA (p<.02), higher affective (p<.000) and miscellaneous (p<.003) and total (p<.04) pain index scores. Using the Bonferroni correction, only one of 78 pain quality descriptors (aching) was selected more frequently by C (77%) than AA (32%). Only one of nine pain pattern descriptors (brief) was selected by AA (39%) more often than C (3%). Conclusions: Despite lack of computer experience, AA subjects matched on important cancer and demographic variables with C subjects reported sensory pain in ways more similar than different, suggesting cultural relevance. Cancer stage and education were not matching variables and may account for the minor differences. We recommend formal cognitive testing of PAINReportIt« for additional cultural sensitivity evidence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRace Differences in Report of Cancer Pain: Real or Artifacten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158833-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Race Differences in Report of Cancer Pain: Real or Artifact</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilkie, Diana, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 S Damen Ave. (MC 802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-413-5469</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">diwilkie@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Young Ok Kim, DrPH, RN, Research Analyst; Marie Suarez, PhD, Project Director; Lauren Richie, MA, Research Assistant; and Hilary Lee, BA, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: Insufficient data are available to support cultural sensitivity of existing, multidimensional pain instruments. The study aim was to compare race effects for a computerized pain instrument, PAINReportIt, an extension of the well-validated and reliable McGill Pain Questionnaire. Examination of racial differences will facilitate instrument revisions and lead to measurement tools that could have potential to reduce disparities known to exist in pain management. Method: Using a matched case design with subjects recruited for studies in Seattle and Chicago, baseline PAINReportIt&laquo; data were compared for 31 African American (AA) (61% women, mean age 58 +15 yrs) and 31 Caucasian (C) (61% women, mean age 54 +13 yrs) cancer patients, matched on cancer type, gender, and age. Computer experience and sensory pain (location, intensity, quality, pattern) scores were compared with t tests or Chi Square analysis. Results: More AA (78%) than C (35%) had never used a computer (p&lt;.001) and had a history of poor pain relief (p&lt;.02). Common pain experiences (toothache, headache, stomachache) were rated more intense by AA than C (p&lt;.000). Current pain intensity scores were not different. C reported more cancer pain sites than AA (p&lt;.02), higher affective (p&lt;.000) and miscellaneous (p&lt;.003) and total (p&lt;.04) pain index scores. Using the Bonferroni correction, only one of 78 pain quality descriptors (aching) was selected more frequently by C (77%) than AA (32%). Only one of nine pain pattern descriptors (brief) was selected by AA (39%) more often than C (3%). Conclusions: Despite lack of computer experience, AA subjects matched on important cancer and demographic variables with C subjects reported sensory pain in ways more similar than different, suggesting cultural relevance. Cancer stage and education were not matching variables and may account for the minor differences. We recommend formal cognitive testing of PAINReportIt&laquo; for additional cultural sensitivity evidence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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