Stress, Social Support, and Anxiety as Predictors of Pregnancy Complications for Low Income Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158835
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress, Social Support, and Anxiety as Predictors of Pregnancy Complications for Low Income Women
Abstract:
Stress, Social Support, and Anxiety as Predictors of Pregnancy Complications for Low Income Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Zachariah, Rachel, DNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Faculty of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313-577-8865
Purpose The purpose of this research was to contribute to the reduction of the adverse outcomes of pregnancy in low-income women through the identification of modifiable psychosocial risk factors as predictors.

Theoretical/Conceptual Framework A model that emphasizes the direct, negative contribution of life events and the direct positive contribution of social supports to health outcomes during pregnancy (Cobb, 1976; Kaplan, Cassel & Gore, 1977; & Bowlby, 1979) was tested in the study.

Subjects and Method A convenience sample of women (n=111) 18 through 35 years of age, Medicaid eligible, between 14 and 22 weeks of pregnancy, without preexisting medical conditions, and fluent in English, were utilized for this prospective correlational study. Self report questionnaire to measure attachments, social support, life stress, anxiety, and psychological well-being were administered individually between 14 and 22 weeks, and between 32 and 42 weeks of pregnancy. The hospital records of participants were reviewed to determine negative pregnancy outcomes.

Results Women who experienced complications of pregnancy had significantly less emotional, tangible, and total functional social support. Discriminate analysis was performed. The most important discriminating factors for newborn complications were negative life events and the interaction of emotional support with negative life events. The most important discriminating factors for pregnancy complications were state anxiety and total functional social support.

Conclusion The findings of the study validated positive psychological well-being for low-income pregnant women with lower life stress, lower state and trait anxiety, and positive attachment relationship with the mother. The findings also support the observation that a large percentage of low-income women are at risk for pregnancy, labor, delivery, and newborn complications.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress, Social Support, and Anxiety as Predictors of Pregnancy Complications for Low Income Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158835-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress, Social Support, and Anxiety as Predictors of Pregnancy Complications for Low Income Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zachariah, Rachel, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-577-8865</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ax7852@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose The purpose of this research was to contribute to the reduction of the adverse outcomes of pregnancy in low-income women through the identification of modifiable psychosocial risk factors as predictors.<br/><br/>Theoretical/Conceptual Framework A model that emphasizes the direct, negative contribution of life events and the direct positive contribution of social supports to health outcomes during pregnancy (Cobb, 1976; Kaplan, Cassel &amp; Gore, 1977; &amp; Bowlby, 1979) was tested in the study.<br/><br/>Subjects and Method A convenience sample of women (n=111) 18 through 35 years of age, Medicaid eligible, between 14 and 22 weeks of pregnancy, without preexisting medical conditions, and fluent in English, were utilized for this prospective correlational study. Self report questionnaire to measure attachments, social support, life stress, anxiety, and psychological well-being were administered individually between 14 and 22 weeks, and between 32 and 42 weeks of pregnancy. The hospital records of participants were reviewed to determine negative pregnancy outcomes.<br/><br/>Results Women who experienced complications of pregnancy had significantly less emotional, tangible, and total functional social support. Discriminate analysis was performed. The most important discriminating factors for newborn complications were negative life events and the interaction of emotional support with negative life events. The most important discriminating factors for pregnancy complications were state anxiety and total functional social support. <br/><br/>Conclusion The findings of the study validated positive psychological well-being for low-income pregnant women with lower life stress, lower state and trait anxiety, and positive attachment relationship with the mother. The findings also support the observation that a large percentage of low-income women are at risk for pregnancy, labor, delivery, and newborn complications.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.