2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158837
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Current Breastfeeding Knowledge of Senior University Nursing Students
Abstract:
Current Breastfeeding Knowledge of Senior University Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Ahmed, Azza, DNSc, IBCLC, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:502 N. University Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
Contact Telephone:765-494-4040
Co-Authors:A.H. Ahmed, C.J. Richardson, Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; D.L. Bantz, Nursing, Ball State University, Muncie, IN;
Background: Studies in the past have found that nurses have inadequate knowledge about breastfeeding topics and suggested improvement in breastfeeding education. Objective: To assess the current breastfeeding knowledge of senior nursing students and to examine the variables associated with breastfeeding knowledge and skills. Method: Design: An exploratory descriptive design. Subjects: A total of 115 senior nursing students from two different Midwestern universities filled out the questionnaire. Inclusion criteria included students who finished maternal/child nursing didactic and clinical courses, and were regular bachelor senior nursing students and second degree students. Exclusion criteria included students who had not finished their maternal/child clinical. Instrument: A Breastfeeding Knowledge Questionnaire was adapted from Brodribb, Fallon, Jackson, and Hegney (2008). The questionnaire consisted of 24 items covering three main categories in breastfeeding knowledge. Those categories included benefits of breastfeeding, physiology of lactation and feeding adequacy, breastfeeding skills including exclusive breastfeeding, maternal conditions that may affect breastfeeding, and common breastfeeding problems. A pilot study with nine students was done to test the amount of time necessary to complete the questionnaire and its feasibility. Statistical Analysis: Two-tailed t test was used to test the differences in breastfeeding knowledge categories. Pearson correlation was used to test the relationship between the knowledge categories while percentage distribution was used to describe students' knowledge for each item. Results: Findings revealed a significant difference in the students' knowledge regarding physiology and benefits (t = -3.615, p = .000) and benefits and skills (t = 5.255 and P = .000). There was also significant correlation between knowledge of physiology and benefits (r = 0. 241, p = .009) and benefits and skills (r = .027, p = .000). Conclusion: More strategies to improve breastfeeding education in nursing curriculum focusing on breastfeeding skills need to be addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCurrent Breastfeeding Knowledge of Senior University Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158837-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Current Breastfeeding Knowledge of Senior University Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ahmed, Azza, DNSc, IBCLC, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">502 N. University Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765-494-4040</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ahmedah@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A.H. Ahmed, C.J. Richardson, Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; D.L. Bantz, Nursing, Ball State University, Muncie, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Studies in the past have found that nurses have inadequate knowledge about breastfeeding topics and suggested improvement in breastfeeding education. Objective: To assess the current breastfeeding knowledge of senior nursing students and to examine the variables associated with breastfeeding knowledge and skills. Method: Design: An exploratory descriptive design. Subjects: A total of 115 senior nursing students from two different Midwestern universities filled out the questionnaire. Inclusion criteria included students who finished maternal/child nursing didactic and clinical courses, and were regular bachelor senior nursing students and second degree students. Exclusion criteria included students who had not finished their maternal/child clinical. Instrument: A Breastfeeding Knowledge Questionnaire was adapted from Brodribb, Fallon, Jackson, and Hegney (2008). The questionnaire consisted of 24 items covering three main categories in breastfeeding knowledge. Those categories included benefits of breastfeeding, physiology of lactation and feeding adequacy, breastfeeding skills including exclusive breastfeeding, maternal conditions that may affect breastfeeding, and common breastfeeding problems. A pilot study with nine students was done to test the amount of time necessary to complete the questionnaire and its feasibility. Statistical Analysis: Two-tailed t test was used to test the differences in breastfeeding knowledge categories. Pearson correlation was used to test the relationship between the knowledge categories while percentage distribution was used to describe students' knowledge for each item. Results: Findings revealed a significant difference in the students' knowledge regarding physiology and benefits (t = -3.615, p = .000) and benefits and skills (t = 5.255 and P = .000). There was also significant correlation between knowledge of physiology and benefits (r = 0. 241, p = .009) and benefits and skills (r = .027, p = .000). Conclusion: More strategies to improve breastfeeding education in nursing curriculum focusing on breastfeeding skills need to be addressed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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