Is There an Association Between Nurses' Uniform Color and Feelings/Emotions in School-age Children Receiving Healthcare?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158838
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is There an Association Between Nurses' Uniform Color and Feelings/Emotions in School-age Children Receiving Healthcare?
Abstract:
Is There an Association Between Nurses' Uniform Color and Feelings/Emotions in School-age Children Receiving Healthcare?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Albert, Nancy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Cleveland Clinic
Title:Nursing Research and Innovation
Contact Address:9500 Euclid Avenue, Mailcode J3-4, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA
Contact Telephone:216-444-7028
Co-Authors:N.M. Albert , J. Forney, E. Slifcak, Nursing Research and Innovation, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; J. BUrke, Children's Hospital, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; J.F. Bena, S.M. Morrison, Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH;
Purpose: To examine relationships between 6 pantset uniform colors and 20 feelings/emotions; learn if state anxiety level moderates relationships between feelings/emotions and uniform color and learn the preferred uniform color. Conceptual Framework: In 1991, researchers reported that children feared a nurse wearing a white uniform, but findings were limited by methodology flaws. While receiving healthcare, positive and negative feelings/emotions can stimulate endorphins that block stress or pain or stimulate a stress response. Subjects: 233 school-aged children (7-17 years old; 40% boys; 56% hospitalized, 75% Caucasian, mean age 12.27 years) being treated in a Children's hospital or ambulatory clinic of a large, Midwest tertiary care center. Method: Prospective, cross-sectional design using surveys that measured participant characteristics, state anxiety (Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory for children), and associations between 6 uniform color options and 20 feeling/emotions. Analyses included descriptive statistics and measures of association. Results: 7 of 10 positive feelings/emotions were most often associated with solid blue or bold pink or yellow patterned uniform tops and least associated with solid white and small flowered print tops (all P less than or equal to 0.002). All 10 negative feelings/emotions (upset, nervous, jittery, scared, worried, frightened, troubled, bothered, terrified and mixed-up) were associated with "uniform color does not matter" (all P<0.001). Mean anxiety level was low (1.54 +/- 0.28). Except for the bold yellow patterned top/white pant, other uniforms were selected as more frightening by a greater percentage of high anxiety subjects than low anxiety subjects (P = 0.03); however no other differences in uniform colors to convey emotions based on anxiety or by subject characteristics were found. Bold pink patterned top (29.4%) and solid blue (28%) uniforms were preferred. Conclusions: School-age children do not associate negative feelings/emotions (i.e., frightened) with nurse uniform color; however, they associate positive feelings/emotions with solid blue or bold pink patterned uniforms and also prefer these same options.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs There an Association Between Nurses' Uniform Color and Feelings/Emotions in School-age Children Receiving Healthcare?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158838-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is There an Association Between Nurses' Uniform Color and Feelings/Emotions in School-age Children Receiving Healthcare?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Albert, Nancy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cleveland Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Research and Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9500 Euclid Avenue, Mailcode J3-4, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-444-7028</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">albertn@ccf.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.M. Albert , J. Forney, E. Slifcak, Nursing Research and Innovation, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; J. BUrke, Children's Hospital, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; J.F. Bena, S.M. Morrison, Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To examine relationships between 6 pantset uniform colors and 20 feelings/emotions; learn if state anxiety level moderates relationships between feelings/emotions and uniform color and learn the preferred uniform color. Conceptual Framework: In 1991, researchers reported that children feared a nurse wearing a white uniform, but findings were limited by methodology flaws. While receiving healthcare, positive and negative feelings/emotions can stimulate endorphins that block stress or pain or stimulate a stress response. Subjects: 233 school-aged children (7-17 years old; 40% boys; 56% hospitalized, 75% Caucasian, mean age 12.27 years) being treated in a Children's hospital or ambulatory clinic of a large, Midwest tertiary care center. Method: Prospective, cross-sectional design using surveys that measured participant characteristics, state anxiety (Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory for children), and associations between 6 uniform color options and 20 feeling/emotions. Analyses included descriptive statistics and measures of association. Results: 7 of 10 positive feelings/emotions were most often associated with solid blue or bold pink or yellow patterned uniform tops and least associated with solid white and small flowered print tops (all P less than or equal to 0.002). All 10 negative feelings/emotions (upset, nervous, jittery, scared, worried, frightened, troubled, bothered, terrified and mixed-up) were associated with &quot;uniform color does not matter&quot; (all P&lt;0.001). Mean anxiety level was low (1.54 +/- 0.28). Except for the bold yellow patterned top/white pant, other uniforms were selected as more frightening by a greater percentage of high anxiety subjects than low anxiety subjects (P = 0.03); however no other differences in uniform colors to convey emotions based on anxiety or by subject characteristics were found. Bold pink patterned top (29.4%) and solid blue (28%) uniforms were preferred. Conclusions: School-age children do not associate negative feelings/emotions (i.e., frightened) with nurse uniform color; however, they associate positive feelings/emotions with solid blue or bold pink patterned uniforms and also prefer these same options.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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