2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158839
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Masculinity and Self-Care Behavior in Hypertensive African Americans
Abstract:
Masculinity and Self-Care Behavior in Hypertensive African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Allen, Wilfred, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Contact Address:40575 Paisley Circle, Novi, MI, 48377, USA
Contact Telephone:586 854-2508
Co-Authors:W. Allen, S. Pickett, M. Franklin, R.M. Peters, , Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;
Problem & Theory: Over 73 million Americans have hypertension (HTN), with African Americans having the highest prevalence rates. African American men are at high risk for HTN and its sequale as men are less likely to engage in preventive behaviors, be aware of, treated for, or have the disease under control. Little is known about the ideology of masculinity as it relates to HTN prevention and treatment. This study, guided by the self-care deficit nursing theory (SCDNT), examined masculinity as a component of self-care agency (SCA) and determined its relationship to HTN self-care behaviors and recorded blood pressure (BP). Methods: A cross-sectional study enrolled 51 male and 60 female hypertensive African Americans (25-65 years of age; M = 61;59.1, SD = 9.05) to assess knowledge and practice of behaviors necessary for HTN control. The BP Knowledge scale (Alpha = .85) and BP Self-Care scale (Alpha = .68) were administered to all participants, and men completed 5subscales of the Male Role Norm Inventory (MRNI; aggression, emotionality, non-traditional attitude, self-reliance, and achievement; Alpha =.75 -.83). BP was recorded using an automated device. Results: BP Knowledge was positively, significantly correlated with BP Self-care (r =.227, p = .018) and inversely with SBP (r = -.213, p =.025). BP Self-care was inversely correlated with DBP (r = -.221, p = .022). There were no significant gender differences based on age, education, years of HTN diagnoses, BP Knowledge, or recorded SBP or DBP. There was a significant difference on BP self-care with men reporting greater self-care (t106) = 2.93, p = .004). All subscales were significantly associated with BP Self-care (r = 26-.41) but not to SBP or DBP. Age was not significantly related to traditional ideas of masculinity. Implications: Findings from the current study are consistent with conceptualizing masculinity as a component of SCA affecting self-care behaviors but without direct effect on the health outcome (BP). But findings are inconsistent with other research related to masculinity and health-related behaviors. Further research is needed to understand the role of basic conditioning factors in the development of masculinity and how ideas of masculinity influence self-care behaviors related to BP control.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMasculinity and Self-Care Behavior in Hypertensive African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158839-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Masculinity and Self-Care Behavior in Hypertensive African Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Allen, Wilfred, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">40575 Paisley Circle, Novi, MI, 48377, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">586 854-2508</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ar7321@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">W. Allen, S. Pickett, M. Franklin, R.M. Peters, , Wayne State University, Detroit, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem &amp; Theory: Over 73 million Americans have hypertension (HTN), with African Americans having the highest prevalence rates. African American men are at high risk for HTN and its sequale as men are less likely to engage in preventive behaviors, be aware of, treated for, or have the disease under control. Little is known about the ideology of masculinity as it relates to HTN prevention and treatment. This study, guided by the self-care deficit nursing theory (SCDNT), examined masculinity as a component of self-care agency (SCA) and determined its relationship to HTN self-care behaviors and recorded blood pressure (BP). Methods: A cross-sectional study enrolled 51 male and 60 female hypertensive African Americans (25-65 years of age; M = 61;59.1, SD = 9.05) to assess knowledge and practice of behaviors necessary for HTN control. The BP Knowledge scale (Alpha = .85) and BP Self-Care scale (Alpha = .68) were administered to all participants, and men completed 5subscales of the Male Role Norm Inventory (MRNI; aggression, emotionality, non-traditional attitude, self-reliance, and achievement; Alpha =.75 -.83). BP was recorded using an automated device. Results: BP Knowledge was positively, significantly correlated with BP Self-care (r =.227, p = .018) and inversely with SBP (r = -.213, p =.025). BP Self-care was inversely correlated with DBP (r = -.221, p = .022). There were no significant gender differences based on age, education, years of HTN diagnoses, BP Knowledge, or recorded SBP or DBP. There was a significant difference on BP self-care with men reporting greater self-care (t106) = 2.93, p = .004). All subscales were significantly associated with BP Self-care (r = 26-.41) but not to SBP or DBP. Age was not significantly related to traditional ideas of masculinity. Implications: Findings from the current study are consistent with conceptualizing masculinity as a component of SCA affecting self-care behaviors but without direct effect on the health outcome (BP). But findings are inconsistent with other research related to masculinity and health-related behaviors. Further research is needed to understand the role of basic conditioning factors in the development of masculinity and how ideas of masculinity influence self-care behaviors related to BP control.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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