Peer Group Intervention Decreases HIV Stigmatization of Chilean Health Care Workers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158841
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Peer Group Intervention Decreases HIV Stigmatization of Chilean Health Care Workers
Abstract:
Peer Group Intervention Decreases HIV Stigmatization of Chilean Health Care Workers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Araya, Alejandra, PhD student
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:, Rochester, MN, 55906, USA
Contact Telephone:5072061138
Co-Authors:A. Araya, J. Norr, K. Norr, School of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; A. Araya, L. Ferrer, R. Cianelli, M. Bernales, L. Lara, B. Cabieses, L. Irarrazaval, School of Nursing, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, CHIL
Background: Health Care Workers (HCW) stigmatization can negatively affect their HIV prevention teaching, caregiving, and the public's trust. Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an HIV intervention on Chilean HCW's HIV stigmatization. Theoretical framework: Primary Health Care, Self-efficacy, and Freirean adult learning theories guided this program. Subjects: Two low-income communities were randomly assigned to intervention (n=262) or control (n=293) condition, five clinics were selected from each area. Methods: A quasi-experimental study examined impacts of a peer-group intervention for HIV prevention on HCWs in two communities. A care-related HIV stigmatization scale (alpha=.727) combined three areas: comfort giving care to a person with HIV and AIDS (PWHA), comfort shaking hands with PLWH at work, and whether the HCW preference was not to give care to PWHA. Analysis used comparison of means and regression. Results: HCWs' care-related HIV stigmatization was associated with lower education, low status occupations, low income, having children, and less HIV knowledge. There was no difference in stigmatization at baseline, but at post-test the intervention group had less stigmatization (1.53 versus 1.81, t- test p<.001). There were significant intervention effects in multivariate regression controlling for demographic variables and knowledge. Conclusions: Care-related HIV stigmatization by Chilean HCWs can be reduced through a peer group HIV prevention intervention, which may improve prevention counseling, quality of care, and willingness of clients to seek HIV testing and care. Acknowledgements: To Dr. Beverly McElmurry, for abstracts critique. This research was partially funded by the John E. Fogarty International Center, NIH: FIRCA: R03-TW-006980 (parent grant NINR: R03 NR009297) and AIDS International Training and Research Program at UIC (AITRP-D43 TW00141).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePeer Group Intervention Decreases HIV Stigmatization of Chilean Health Care Workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158841-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Peer Group Intervention Decreases HIV Stigmatization of Chilean Health Care Workers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Araya, Alejandra, PhD student</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Rochester, MN, 55906, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">5072061138</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aaraya2@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Araya, J. Norr, K. Norr, School of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; A. Araya, L. Ferrer, R. Cianelli, M. Bernales, L. Lara, B. Cabieses, L. Irarrazaval, School of Nursing, Pontificia Universidad Cat&oacute;lica de Chile, Santiago, CHIL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Health Care Workers (HCW) stigmatization can negatively affect their HIV prevention teaching, caregiving, and the public's trust. Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an HIV intervention on Chilean HCW's HIV stigmatization. Theoretical framework: Primary Health Care, Self-efficacy, and Freirean adult learning theories guided this program. Subjects: Two low-income communities were randomly assigned to intervention (n=262) or control (n=293) condition, five clinics were selected from each area. Methods: A quasi-experimental study examined impacts of a peer-group intervention for HIV prevention on HCWs in two communities. A care-related HIV stigmatization scale (alpha=.727) combined three areas: comfort giving care to a person with HIV and AIDS (PWHA), comfort shaking hands with PLWH at work, and whether the HCW preference was not to give care to PWHA. Analysis used comparison of means and regression. Results: HCWs' care-related HIV stigmatization was associated with lower education, low status occupations, low income, having children, and less HIV knowledge. There was no difference in stigmatization at baseline, but at post-test the intervention group had less stigmatization (1.53 versus 1.81, t- test p&lt;.001). There were significant intervention effects in multivariate regression controlling for demographic variables and knowledge. Conclusions: Care-related HIV stigmatization by Chilean HCWs can be reduced through a peer group HIV prevention intervention, which may improve prevention counseling, quality of care, and willingness of clients to seek HIV testing and care. Acknowledgements: To Dr. Beverly McElmurry, for abstracts critique. This research was partially funded by the John E. Fogarty International Center, NIH: FIRCA: R03-TW-006980 (parent grant NINR: R03 NR009297) and AIDS International Training and Research Program at UIC (AITRP-D43 TW00141).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:26:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:26:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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