2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158843
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Persons with Impaired Mobility: Transition to Adulthood
Abstract:
Persons with Impaired Mobility: Transition to Adulthood
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Ayres, Lioness, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Contact Address:50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-6624
Co-Authors:L. Ayres, A. Kueny, , University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Transition from adolescence to adulthood is a critical developmental passage in the lives of all young people but especially for those with impaired mobility. Advances in neonatal and trauma care have saved the lives of infants and children who formerly would not have survived, leaving them with residual functional limitations. Such limitations make research participation burdensome, leaving people with disabilities underrepresented in the research process about transition to adulthood. This underrepresentation undermines both the internal and external validity of research on persons with disabilities and further disadvantages an already marginalized group. In order to develop a comprehensive description of the transition experience of young adults with mobility impairments, we designed a web-based message board to collect interview data asynchronously over the Internet. Participants were recruited by mail from a database provided by a large Midwestern medical center with a Center for Excellence in Disability and completed eligibility screening and the consent process anonymously using the web site. Twenty-one participants age 19-50 provided usable information for analysis. Concepts used in data collection were derived from the International Classification of Function (WHO, 2002) and the social model of disability. Interview data were analyzed within and across cases with principle emphasis on across-case comparisons (Ayres, Kavanaugh, & Knafl, 2003). Participants were located on a transition trajectory (transition in process, achieved, or interrupted) based on their descriptions of independence. Independence was defined as the ability to direct their own lives. Within these three groups, we identified each participants' descriptions of self-determination, social participation, and access to health care. Using these characteristics, we describe hallmarks of successful and interrupted transition to adult independence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePersons with Impaired Mobility: Transition to Adulthooden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158843-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Persons with Impaired Mobility: Transition to Adulthood</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ayres, Lioness, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-6624</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lioness-ayres@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L. Ayres, A. Kueny, , University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Transition from adolescence to adulthood is a critical developmental passage in the lives of all young people but especially for those with impaired mobility. Advances in neonatal and trauma care have saved the lives of infants and children who formerly would not have survived, leaving them with residual functional limitations. Such limitations make research participation burdensome, leaving people with disabilities underrepresented in the research process about transition to adulthood. This underrepresentation undermines both the internal and external validity of research on persons with disabilities and further disadvantages an already marginalized group. In order to develop a comprehensive description of the transition experience of young adults with mobility impairments, we designed a web-based message board to collect interview data asynchronously over the Internet. Participants were recruited by mail from a database provided by a large Midwestern medical center with a Center for Excellence in Disability and completed eligibility screening and the consent process anonymously using the web site. Twenty-one participants age 19-50 provided usable information for analysis. Concepts used in data collection were derived from the International Classification of Function (WHO, 2002) and the social model of disability. Interview data were analyzed within and across cases with principle emphasis on across-case comparisons (Ayres, Kavanaugh, &amp; Knafl, 2003). Participants were located on a transition trajectory (transition in process, achieved, or interrupted) based on their descriptions of independence. Independence was defined as the ability to direct their own lives. Within these three groups, we identified each participants' descriptions of self-determination, social participation, and access to health care. Using these characteristics, we describe hallmarks of successful and interrupted transition to adult independence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:27:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:27:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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