2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158844
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Self-Silencing on Physical Activity among African American Women
Abstract:
The Effect of Self-Silencing on Physical Activity among African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Banks, JoAnne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Winston-Salem State University
Title:nursing
Contact Address:601 S. Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive, F.L. Atkins Building, Suite 436, Winston-Salem, NC, 27110, USA
Contact Telephone:336-750-3086
Co-Authors:J. Banks, nursing, winston-salem state university, winston-salem, NC;
Purpose: This study will gather preliminary data concerning self-silencing among African American women, and evaluate the potency of self-silencing as a predictor of physical activity (PA) behavior. Theoretical Framework: Dana Jack's Silencing the Self model serves as the theoretical framework for this study. This model suggests that silencing certain actions, thoughts, and feelings are appropriate or necessary behaviors for creating and maintaining safe, intimate relationships. Self silencing expends a lot of energy and leaves women without accurate knowledge of their real needs and how to meet them. Using the Silencing the Self model to examine barriers to African American women's participation in PA may provide new insight integral to the development of efficacious interventions. Subjects: Community dwelling African American women 35 years of age and older living in the Piedmont Triad (NC) area. Method: Participants will complete the Silencing the Self Scale, International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and a demographic form during in-home visits. Anticipated Method of Analysis: Summary scores for the measures will be created, and internal consistency and reliability estimates of different constructs will be examined. Frequency analyses will be conducted using SAS software to see the distribution of clinical characteristics, demographic factors, self-silencing, and PA. Correlation analyses will be conducted to examine relationship between the self-silencing and the self-reported time spent engaged in physical activity. Factor analyses will be used to examine the nature and structure of overall PA and self-silencing behavior. Finally, after controlling for age, linear regression analyses and path analyses will be used to examine how self-silencing predicts PA behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Self-Silencing on Physical Activity among African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158844-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Self-Silencing on Physical Activity among African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Banks, JoAnne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winston-Salem State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">601 S. Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive, F.L. Atkins Building, Suite 436, Winston-Salem, NC, 27110, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">336-750-3086</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wallacejb@wssu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Banks, nursing, winston-salem state university, winston-salem, NC;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study will gather preliminary data concerning self-silencing among African American women, and evaluate the potency of self-silencing as a predictor of physical activity (PA) behavior. Theoretical Framework: Dana Jack's Silencing the Self model serves as the theoretical framework for this study. This model suggests that silencing certain actions, thoughts, and feelings are appropriate or necessary behaviors for creating and maintaining safe, intimate relationships. Self silencing expends a lot of energy and leaves women without accurate knowledge of their real needs and how to meet them. Using the Silencing the Self model to examine barriers to African American women's participation in PA may provide new insight integral to the development of efficacious interventions. Subjects: Community dwelling African American women 35 years of age and older living in the Piedmont Triad (NC) area. Method: Participants will complete the Silencing the Self Scale, International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and a demographic form during in-home visits. Anticipated Method of Analysis: Summary scores for the measures will be created, and internal consistency and reliability estimates of different constructs will be examined. Frequency analyses will be conducted using SAS software to see the distribution of clinical characteristics, demographic factors, self-silencing, and PA. Correlation analyses will be conducted to examine relationship between the self-silencing and the self-reported time spent engaged in physical activity. Factor analyses will be used to examine the nature and structure of overall PA and self-silencing behavior. Finally, after controlling for age, linear regression analyses and path analyses will be used to examine how self-silencing predicts PA behavior.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:27:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:27:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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