2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158845
Type:
Presentation
Title:
1-Minute Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Heart Failure
Abstract:
1-Minute Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Bauer, Lisa, PhD, ANP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:14404 S. 24th Street, Bellevue, NE, 68123, USA
Contact Telephone:402-932-1849
Co-Authors:L. Bauer, Family Health Care Nursing, University of California , San Francisco, CA; J. Johnson, Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of California , San Francisco, CA; B. Pozehl, Adult Health and Illness, University of Nebraska Medical Center , Linc
Problem Statement: Clinicians recognize that intact cognitive function is paramount to an individual heart failure (HF) patient's overall ability to follow complex medical regimens, recognize worsening symptoms and avoid frequent hospitalizations; however, most neuropsychological batteries require special staff training and up to eight hours to administer, making them impractical for clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary evidence for use of a brief neuropsychological assessment, letter fluency, as a screening tool for cognitive impairment in chronic HF. Methodology: The sample consisted of 80 stable HF patients (64% male) with a mean age of 72 years (plus12 years) and a mean ejection fraction of 38% (plus 11%). Cognitive impairment was defined as a letter fluency z-score of < (-) 1.5 or a Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) total score of < 24. Both cut-points are routinely used in research and clinical practice to identify cognitive impairment. Using these definitions, descriptive statistics were run to compare letter fluency's sensitivity to detect cognitive impairment in a sample of stable HF patients against the most common measure of cognitive impairment found in the HF literature, the MMSE. Results: The mean education level was 14 years (plus 3 years). Letter fluency detected cognitive impairment in 53% of the sample compared to the MMSE which detected cognitive impairment in only 6% of the sample. Implications: Letter fluency requires one minute to administer and minimal staff training, making it feasible for use in clinic settings. The results of this study provide initial support for the use of letter fluency as a screening tool for cognitive impairment in the stable HF population. Further studies, with larger sample sizes, and functional measures are warranted to provide continued support for use of letter fluency as a screening measure in stable HF. The results are limited by the convenience sample.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title1-Minute Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158845-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">1-Minute Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bauer, Lisa, PhD, ANP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14404 S. 24th Street, Bellevue, NE, 68123, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-932-1849</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lisa.bauer@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L. Bauer, Family Health Care Nursing, University of California , San Francisco, CA; J. Johnson, Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of California , San Francisco, CA; B. Pozehl, Adult Health and Illness, University of Nebraska Medical Center , Linc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: Clinicians recognize that intact cognitive function is paramount to an individual heart failure (HF) patient's overall ability to follow complex medical regimens, recognize worsening symptoms and avoid frequent hospitalizations; however, most neuropsychological batteries require special staff training and up to eight hours to administer, making them impractical for clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary evidence for use of a brief neuropsychological assessment, letter fluency, as a screening tool for cognitive impairment in chronic HF. Methodology: The sample consisted of 80 stable HF patients (64% male) with a mean age of 72 years (plus12 years) and a mean ejection fraction of 38% (plus 11%). Cognitive impairment was defined as a letter fluency z-score of &lt; (-) 1.5 or a Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) total score of &lt; 24. Both cut-points are routinely used in research and clinical practice to identify cognitive impairment. Using these definitions, descriptive statistics were run to compare letter fluency's sensitivity to detect cognitive impairment in a sample of stable HF patients against the most common measure of cognitive impairment found in the HF literature, the MMSE. Results: The mean education level was 14 years (plus 3 years). Letter fluency detected cognitive impairment in 53% of the sample compared to the MMSE which detected cognitive impairment in only 6% of the sample. Implications: Letter fluency requires one minute to administer and minimal staff training, making it feasible for use in clinic settings. The results of this study provide initial support for the use of letter fluency as a screening tool for cognitive impairment in the stable HF population. Further studies, with larger sample sizes, and functional measures are warranted to provide continued support for use of letter fluency as a screening measure in stable HF. The results are limited by the convenience sample.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:27:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:27:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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