The role of positive cognition in Egyptian elders' relocation adjustment: An Application of Resilience Theory

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158846
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The role of positive cognition in Egyptian elders' relocation adjustment: An Application of Resilience Theory
Abstract:
The role of positive cognition in Egyptian elders' relocation adjustment: An Application of Resilience Theory
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Bekhet, Abir, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University College of Nursing
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:530 North 16th Street, Milwaukee, WI, 53233, USA
Contact Telephone:1.12019E+12
Co-Authors:A.K. Bekhet, Nursing, Marquette University, College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI; R. Fouad, Nursing, Alexandria University, Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria, EGYPT; J.A. Zauszniewski, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
In Egypt, the absolute number of elders over the age of 60 years is large enough not to be ignored. Relocation is a major life event that has been found to adversely affect elders' adjustment. Theoretical framework: Resilience theory suggests that an elder's resilience in adjusting to relocation may determined by the interaction of risk factors associated with relocation (relocation controllability) and positive cognitions, which serve as protective factors. Purpose: This study examined whether the relationship between relocation controllability (risk factors) and adjustment (resilience indicator) was mediated or moderated by positive cognitions (protective factors). Subjects: Study participants were 94 cognitively unimpaired elders (aged 60 plus) who relocated to retirement communities in Alexandria, Egypt. Methods: A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used to examine hypothesized relationships among the study variables. Elders completed translated measures of relocation controllability, positive cognitions, and relocation adjustment during a structured interview. Results: Using simple linear regression and hierarchical multiple regression, results showed that relocation controllability had direct negative effects on positive cognitions and relocation adjustment (B = -.41, p < .001; B = -.36, p < .001 respectively). Positive cognitions had a moderating effect on the relationship between relocation controllability and relocation adjustment; the addition of the interaction term was significant and the amount of variance explained rose from 23% to 33% (B = -.33, t = -3.87, p < .001). Results also indicated that positive cognitions had a partially mediating effect on the relationship between relocation controllability and adjustment; there was a substantial drop in the beta weight of relocation controllability (B = -.36 to -.20) accompanied by a change in significance when positive cognition entered the equation. Conclusions:The findings suggest that it is imperative for nurses to generate primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions to enhance positive cognition for elders facing the need to relocate.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe role of positive cognition in Egyptian elders' relocation adjustment: An Application of Resilience Theoryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158846-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The role of positive cognition in Egyptian elders' relocation adjustment: An Application of Resilience Theory</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bekhet, Abir, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">530 North 16th Street, Milwaukee, WI, 53233, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">1.12019E+12</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">siha9@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A.K. Bekhet, Nursing, Marquette University, College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI; R. Fouad, Nursing, Alexandria University, Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria, EGYPT; J.A. Zauszniewski, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In Egypt, the absolute number of elders over the age of 60 years is large enough not to be ignored. Relocation is a major life event that has been found to adversely affect elders' adjustment. Theoretical framework: Resilience theory suggests that an elder's resilience in adjusting to relocation may determined by the interaction of risk factors associated with relocation (relocation controllability) and positive cognitions, which serve as protective factors. Purpose: This study examined whether the relationship between relocation controllability (risk factors) and adjustment (resilience indicator) was mediated or moderated by positive cognitions (protective factors). Subjects: Study participants were 94 cognitively unimpaired elders (aged 60 plus) who relocated to retirement communities in Alexandria, Egypt. Methods: A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used to examine hypothesized relationships among the study variables. Elders completed translated measures of relocation controllability, positive cognitions, and relocation adjustment during a structured interview. Results: Using simple linear regression and hierarchical multiple regression, results showed that relocation controllability had direct negative effects on positive cognitions and relocation adjustment (B = -.41, p &lt; .001; B = -.36, p &lt; .001 respectively). Positive cognitions had a moderating effect on the relationship between relocation controllability and relocation adjustment; the addition of the interaction term was significant and the amount of variance explained rose from 23% to 33% (B = -.33, t = -3.87, p &lt; .001). Results also indicated that positive cognitions had a partially mediating effect on the relationship between relocation controllability and adjustment; there was a substantial drop in the beta weight of relocation controllability (B = -.36 to -.20) accompanied by a change in significance when positive cognition entered the equation. Conclusions:The findings suggest that it is imperative for nurses to generate primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions to enhance positive cognition for elders facing the need to relocate.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:27:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:27:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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