The Relationship Among Executive Function, AD/HD, Overeating Behaviors and Obesity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158854
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Among Executive Function, AD/HD, Overeating Behaviors and Obesity
Abstract:
The Relationship Among Executive Function, AD/HD, Overeating Behaviors and Obesity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Dempsey, Anita, Ph.D
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:7660 Burlinehills Ct, Cincinnati, OH, 45244, USA
Contact Telephone:513-558-5288
Co-Authors:A. Dempsey, J. Dyehouse, College of Nursing, The University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH;
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) and obesity (BMI > 30) are complex and costly disorders with profound effects on the physical, emotional, and social well-being of individuals, and society. Both are associated with comorbid physical and psychological conditions, and billions of dollars in healthcare costs. Prevalence studies reveal a disproportionate incidence of AD/HD in obese individuals, who often require greater treatment time, incur greater treatment costs, and are frequently less successful treating their obesity than their counterparts without AD/HD, leaving them at higher risk for physical and emotional complications of obesity. Impaired executive function (EF), the cognitive ability for self-understanding and regulation, is a fundamental characteristic of AD/HD. However, EF and AD/HD are rarely considered in assessment or treatment of obese individuals. Little is known about EF, adult AD/HD symptoms, and their relationship with overeating behaviors contributing to obesity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that low EF in the domains of attention and impulsivity is seen in individuals with 4 or more symptoms of adult AD/HD, and is associated with specific overeating behaviors of increased emotional eating, low cognitive restraint to food, high disinhibition around food, and high susceptibility to hunger which contribute to adult obesity. A non-experimental single group design was used. Data collected from 125 obese community participants included: the Stroop Test and Barratt Impulsivity Scale-11, EF measures; the Adult Self-Rating Scale- IV.I, a screen of adult AD/HD symptoms; the Emotional Eating Scale, and Eating Inventory measures of overeating behaviors; and Body Mass Index, an obesity measure. Path analysis was used to test the hypothesized model. Guided by theory, the hypothesized model was modified to better fit the data, and testing using chi square (x2=6.15, 6 df, p = 0.4) and RMSEA (0.014) indicated a very good fit for the data. Results increase awareness of need to assess for decreased EF and AD/HD symptoms in obese individuals. Strategies need to be developed and tested to address unique challenges of individuals with AD/HD in managing overeating behaviors which lead to obesity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Among Executive Function, AD/HD, Overeating Behaviors and Obesityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158854-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship Among Executive Function, AD/HD, Overeating Behaviors and Obesity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dempsey, Anita, Ph.D</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7660 Burlinehills Ct, Cincinnati, OH, 45244, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-558-5288</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">anita.dempsey@uc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Dempsey, J. Dyehouse, College of Nursing, The University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) and obesity (BMI &gt; 30) are complex and costly disorders with profound effects on the physical, emotional, and social well-being of individuals, and society. Both are associated with comorbid physical and psychological conditions, and billions of dollars in healthcare costs. Prevalence studies reveal a disproportionate incidence of AD/HD in obese individuals, who often require greater treatment time, incur greater treatment costs, and are frequently less successful treating their obesity than their counterparts without AD/HD, leaving them at higher risk for physical and emotional complications of obesity. Impaired executive function (EF), the cognitive ability for self-understanding and regulation, is a fundamental characteristic of AD/HD. However, EF and AD/HD are rarely considered in assessment or treatment of obese individuals. Little is known about EF, adult AD/HD symptoms, and their relationship with overeating behaviors contributing to obesity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that low EF in the domains of attention and impulsivity is seen in individuals with 4 or more symptoms of adult AD/HD, and is associated with specific overeating behaviors of increased emotional eating, low cognitive restraint to food, high disinhibition around food, and high susceptibility to hunger which contribute to adult obesity. A non-experimental single group design was used. Data collected from 125 obese community participants included: the Stroop Test and Barratt Impulsivity Scale-11, EF measures; the Adult Self-Rating Scale- IV.I, a screen of adult AD/HD symptoms; the Emotional Eating Scale, and Eating Inventory measures of overeating behaviors; and Body Mass Index, an obesity measure. Path analysis was used to test the hypothesized model. Guided by theory, the hypothesized model was modified to better fit the data, and testing using chi square (x2=6.15, 6 df, p = 0.4) and RMSEA (0.014) indicated a very good fit for the data. Results increase awareness of need to assess for decreased EF and AD/HD symptoms in obese individuals. Strategies need to be developed and tested to address unique challenges of individuals with AD/HD in managing overeating behaviors which lead to obesity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:27:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:27:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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