2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158856
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Couples' Attributions of Functional Changes in Prodromal Huntington Disease
Abstract:
Couples' Attributions of Functional Changes in Prodromal Huntington Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Downing, Nancy, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:50 Newton Rd, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-321-7798
Co-Authors:N.R. Downing, J.K. Williams, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; J.S. Paulsen, Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Problem: People who are gene positive for Huntington disease (HD) but have not yet received a clinical diagnosis report subtle changes in ability to do their jobs. Companions also report subtle changes in work function in family members in the pre-clinical (prodromal) period. However, it is unclear whether either attributes these changes to HD or to other causes. Framework: The Common Sense Model of Illness Representation is used to explore attributions for functional work changes in the prodromal HD period. Methods and analysis: Seven gene carriers (informants) and their companions participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. An eighth informant participated without a companion. Data were analyzed through qualitative content analysis. Results: Three attribution themes were identified: Health-related, work-related, and temperament-related. Only one participant attributed a change in a spouse's function to HD. Participants reported multiple non-HD health-related attributions, the most common being aging. Work-related attributions included problems with supervisors, having a bad day, situational factors, and being overworked. Temperament-related attributions pertained to personal characteristics. The active process of forming illness attributions was demonstrated through symptom monitoring and comparison of gene carriers to those with and without HD. Uncertainty regarding how to make attributions for subtle functional changes was expressed by both informants and companions. Discussion: Informants and companions notice subtle changes in work function in HD gene carriers prior to diagnosis. In this small sample, most do not attribute these changes to HD. Attributing changes to HD has implications, including risk of psychological harm. However, possible benefits include the opportunity for gene carriers to be evaluated for prodromal signs of HD, seek medical treatments that may improve work function, and facilitate future planning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCouples' Attributions of Functional Changes in Prodromal Huntington Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158856-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Couples' Attributions of Functional Changes in Prodromal Huntington Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Downing, Nancy, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">50 Newton Rd, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-321-7798</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy-downing@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.R. Downing, J.K. Williams, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; J.S. Paulsen, Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: People who are gene positive for Huntington disease (HD) but have not yet received a clinical diagnosis report subtle changes in ability to do their jobs. Companions also report subtle changes in work function in family members in the pre-clinical (prodromal) period. However, it is unclear whether either attributes these changes to HD or to other causes. Framework: The Common Sense Model of Illness Representation is used to explore attributions for functional work changes in the prodromal HD period. Methods and analysis: Seven gene carriers (informants) and their companions participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. An eighth informant participated without a companion. Data were analyzed through qualitative content analysis. Results: Three attribution themes were identified: Health-related, work-related, and temperament-related. Only one participant attributed a change in a spouse's function to HD. Participants reported multiple non-HD health-related attributions, the most common being aging. Work-related attributions included problems with supervisors, having a bad day, situational factors, and being overworked. Temperament-related attributions pertained to personal characteristics. The active process of forming illness attributions was demonstrated through symptom monitoring and comparison of gene carriers to those with and without HD. Uncertainty regarding how to make attributions for subtle functional changes was expressed by both informants and companions. Discussion: Informants and companions notice subtle changes in work function in HD gene carriers prior to diagnosis. In this small sample, most do not attribute these changes to HD. Attributing changes to HD has implications, including risk of psychological harm. However, possible benefits include the opportunity for gene carriers to be evaluated for prodromal signs of HD, seek medical treatments that may improve work function, and facilitate future planning.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:27:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:27:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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