Strategies for Exercise Adherence and Effects on Outcomes for Patients with Heart Failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158857
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies for Exercise Adherence and Effects on Outcomes for Patients with Heart Failure
Abstract:
Strategies for Exercise Adherence and Effects on Outcomes for Patients with Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Duncan, Kathleen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:PO Box 880220, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA
Contact Telephone:402-472-7338
Co-Authors:K. Duncan, B. Pozehl, M. Hertzog, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE; J. Norman, Physical Therapy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Exercise is a recommended treatment for heart failure (HF) but little is known about exercise adherence in this population. Several adherence strategies have been suggested in the literature but few have been tested for efficacy or studied in patients with HF. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of an exercise adherence intervention on adherence outcomes, (numbers of sessions, duration, intensity), patient perception of the adherence strategies (helpfulness and self-efficacy) and physiological outcomes (symptoms, 6 Minute Walk). The intervention consisted of five adherence strategies (i.e., exercise logs, graphs of exercise goals and participation, an exercise web-site, a heart rate monitor watch, and group support sessions) designed to support the development of exercise self-efficacy. A sample of 42 patients with HF (mean EF=32.5%) were randomly assigned to either an attention control (AC) group (n=20) or an exercise intervention (INV) group (n=22). Only the INV group completed exercise training. Exercise was completed in two, 12 week phases. During Phase 1 (weeks 1-12), the exercise group attended a weekly education class and was instructed in both aerobic and resistance exercise and received the adherence intervention strategies. During Phase 2 (weeks 13-24), the adherence strategies were self-managed. Results indicate the number of sessions declined from Phase 1 to Phase 2 for both aerobic and resistance sessions (p < 0.01). Group support sessions were rated the strategy most helpful to adherence and self-efficacy while the web-site was lowest rated. Symptoms of HF declined and distance walked increased for the INV group compared to the AC group. Finding support the use of the strategies but the decline in exercise during self-management indicates patients with HF may need adherence support for longer than 12 weeks to sustain exercise participation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies for Exercise Adherence and Effects on Outcomes for Patients with Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158857-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strategies for Exercise Adherence and Effects on Outcomes for Patients with Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Duncan, Kathleen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 880220, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-472-7338</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kduncan@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Duncan, B. Pozehl, M. Hertzog, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE; J. Norman, Physical Therapy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Exercise is a recommended treatment for heart failure (HF) but little is known about exercise adherence in this population. Several adherence strategies have been suggested in the literature but few have been tested for efficacy or studied in patients with HF. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of an exercise adherence intervention on adherence outcomes, (numbers of sessions, duration, intensity), patient perception of the adherence strategies (helpfulness and self-efficacy) and physiological outcomes (symptoms, 6 Minute Walk). The intervention consisted of five adherence strategies (i.e., exercise logs, graphs of exercise goals and participation, an exercise web-site, a heart rate monitor watch, and group support sessions) designed to support the development of exercise self-efficacy. A sample of 42 patients with HF (mean EF=32.5%) were randomly assigned to either an attention control (AC) group (n=20) or an exercise intervention (INV) group (n=22). Only the INV group completed exercise training. Exercise was completed in two, 12 week phases. During Phase 1 (weeks 1-12), the exercise group attended a weekly education class and was instructed in both aerobic and resistance exercise and received the adherence intervention strategies. During Phase 2 (weeks 13-24), the adherence strategies were self-managed. Results indicate the number of sessions declined from Phase 1 to Phase 2 for both aerobic and resistance sessions (p &lt; 0.01). Group support sessions were rated the strategy most helpful to adherence and self-efficacy while the web-site was lowest rated. Symptoms of HF declined and distance walked increased for the INV group compared to the AC group. Finding support the use of the strategies but the decline in exercise during self-management indicates patients with HF may need adherence support for longer than 12 weeks to sustain exercise participation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:27:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:27:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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