2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158861
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life of African American Cancer Survivors
Abstract:
Quality of Life of African American Cancer Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Ferrans, Carol, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Biobehavioral Health Science
Contact Address:UIC College of Nursing (MC 802), 845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-8445
Co-Authors:C.E. Ferrans, C. Ryan, S. Freels, R. Molokie, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; L. Archer, C. (Calgb), , Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC; E. Paskett, , Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; D. Hurd, , Wake Forest University, Wins
AIMS: Studies of cancer survivors have provided limited information about African Americans. The study purpose was to identify differences in quality of life between African American cancer survivors and African Americans who have not had cancer, to determine the prevalence of cancer-related problems and their effects on quality of life. METHODS: For this descriptive, case-control study of African Americans (500 cancer survivors, 512 non-cancer controls), the survivor group included breast (n=214), prostate (n=197), and colon cancer (n=89) survivors from 16 CALGB institutions throughout the country, who were essentially cancer free and completed primary cancer treatment at least 3 years earlier. Non-cancer controls were selected via random digit dialing and matched as a group to the survivors, so the two groups were similar in terms of ethnicity, gender, education, and city. The adaptation model developed for cancer survivors by Kornblith (1998) guided this study. RESULTS: Cancer survivors had significantly more comorbidities (p<.0001), sexual problems (p<.0001), and worse physical functioning (p=.002) than non-cancer controls. Diseases associated with aging, such as arthritis, hypertension, heart disease, and osteoporosis, were more common in the survivor group, as well as persistent problems attributed to cancer and treatment. Nevertheless, the survivor group reported greater satisfaction with their lives (p=.02) and better social support (p=.04). The non-cancer controls reported more hostility toward others (p=.002) and felt racial discrimination (p<.0001). The non-cancer group also was more distrustful of physicians (p<.0001), believed more cancer myths (p<.0001), and participated less frequently in cancer screening (p=.0004). The strongest predictors of participation in screening were trust in physician and gender (p< .0001). CONCLUSION: Although the cancer survivors experienced a greater physical burden in terms of comorbidities and physical functioning, their quality of life was better in terms of life satisfaction and social relationships. For the non-cancer group the combination of cancer myths, distrust of physicians, and lower participation in screening suggests areas for future interventions to improve cancer detection in African Americans.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life of African American Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158861-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of Life of African American Cancer Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ferrans, Carol, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Biobehavioral Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">UIC College of Nursing (MC 802), 845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-8445</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cferrans@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.E. Ferrans, C. Ryan, S. Freels, R. Molokie, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; L. Archer, C. (Calgb), , Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC; E. Paskett, , Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; D. Hurd, , Wake Forest University, Wins</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">AIMS: Studies of cancer survivors have provided limited information about African Americans. The study purpose was to identify differences in quality of life between African American cancer survivors and African Americans who have not had cancer, to determine the prevalence of cancer-related problems and their effects on quality of life. METHODS: For this descriptive, case-control study of African Americans (500 cancer survivors, 512 non-cancer controls), the survivor group included breast (n=214), prostate (n=197), and colon cancer (n=89) survivors from 16 CALGB institutions throughout the country, who were essentially cancer free and completed primary cancer treatment at least 3 years earlier. Non-cancer controls were selected via random digit dialing and matched as a group to the survivors, so the two groups were similar in terms of ethnicity, gender, education, and city. The adaptation model developed for cancer survivors by Kornblith (1998) guided this study. RESULTS: Cancer survivors had significantly more comorbidities (p&lt;.0001), sexual problems (p&lt;.0001), and worse physical functioning (p=.002) than non-cancer controls. Diseases associated with aging, such as arthritis, hypertension, heart disease, and osteoporosis, were more common in the survivor group, as well as persistent problems attributed to cancer and treatment. Nevertheless, the survivor group reported greater satisfaction with their lives (p=.02) and better social support (p=.04). The non-cancer controls reported more hostility toward others (p=.002) and felt racial discrimination (p&lt;.0001). The non-cancer group also was more distrustful of physicians (p&lt;.0001), believed more cancer myths (p&lt;.0001), and participated less frequently in cancer screening (p=.0004). The strongest predictors of participation in screening were trust in physician and gender (p&lt; .0001). CONCLUSION: Although the cancer survivors experienced a greater physical burden in terms of comorbidities and physical functioning, their quality of life was better in terms of life satisfaction and social relationships. For the non-cancer group the combination of cancer myths, distrust of physicians, and lower participation in screening suggests areas for future interventions to improve cancer detection in African Americans.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:28:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:28:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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