2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158863
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Experience and Preference for Intuition in Decision Making
Abstract:
Nursing Experience and Preference for Intuition in Decision Making
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Folse, Victoria, PhD, APN, PMHCNS-BC, LCPC
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois Wesleyan University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:PO Box 2900, Bloomington, IL, 61702, USA
Contact Telephone:309-556-3286
Co-Authors:V.N. Folse, Nursing, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL; J.E. Pretz, Psychology, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL;
This paper examines the relationship between domain-specific and domain-general intuition among practicing nurses and student nurses to determine the role of intuition in nurses' decision making. Measures of nursing intuition have not been compared to one another or to measures of general preference for intuition in the psychological literature. Prior research has shown that experienced nurses rely on intuition in clinical judgment, but the unique variables associated with experience and preference for intuition have not been fully explored. A total of 175 practicing nurses and student nurses participated in a web-based survey in the fall of 2007 using multiple measures of intuition from the nursing and psychological literature. Quantitative analyses employed descriptive and inferential statistics. These multiple measures of preference for intuition were combined, resulting in the identification of two independent aspects of nursing intuition uniquely related to general intuition and nursing experience. Results revealed that preference for intuition in nursing was not solely due to general preference for intuition, and that use of nursing intuition increased with experience. These results strengthen the knowledge base of decision making in clinical practice by examining differences in preference for use of intuition among nurses. Improved understanding of the use of intuition in clinical decision making is needed to promote professional practice and favorable patient outcomes. If experience simply leads to increased self-confidence and preference for the use of intuition, this may not actually be related to improved accuracy in judgment. In contrast, if experience provides valuable information on associations between patient symptoms and outcomes, then the use of intuition in clinical practice should be encouraged. Additional research is needed to fully understand the theoretical construct of intuition and its implications for nursing practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Experience and Preference for Intuition in Decision Makingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158863-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Experience and Preference for Intuition in Decision Making</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Folse, Victoria, PhD, APN, PMHCNS-BC, LCPC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois Wesleyan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 2900, Bloomington, IL, 61702, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-556-3286</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vfolse@iwu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">V.N. Folse, Nursing, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL; J.E. Pretz, Psychology, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This paper examines the relationship between domain-specific and domain-general intuition among practicing nurses and student nurses to determine the role of intuition in nurses' decision making. Measures of nursing intuition have not been compared to one another or to measures of general preference for intuition in the psychological literature. Prior research has shown that experienced nurses rely on intuition in clinical judgment, but the unique variables associated with experience and preference for intuition have not been fully explored. A total of 175 practicing nurses and student nurses participated in a web-based survey in the fall of 2007 using multiple measures of intuition from the nursing and psychological literature. Quantitative analyses employed descriptive and inferential statistics. These multiple measures of preference for intuition were combined, resulting in the identification of two independent aspects of nursing intuition uniquely related to general intuition and nursing experience. Results revealed that preference for intuition in nursing was not solely due to general preference for intuition, and that use of nursing intuition increased with experience. These results strengthen the knowledge base of decision making in clinical practice by examining differences in preference for use of intuition among nurses. Improved understanding of the use of intuition in clinical decision making is needed to promote professional practice and favorable patient outcomes. If experience simply leads to increased self-confidence and preference for the use of intuition, this may not actually be related to improved accuracy in judgment. In contrast, if experience provides valuable information on associations between patient symptoms and outcomes, then the use of intuition in clinical practice should be encouraged. Additional research is needed to fully understand the theoretical construct of intuition and its implications for nursing practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:28:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:28:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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