Maintaining Family Connectedness Using Video-Mediated Communication: An Exploratory Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158865
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maintaining Family Connectedness Using Video-Mediated Communication: An Exploratory Study
Abstract:
Maintaining Family Connectedness Using Video-Mediated Communication: An Exploratory Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Furukawa, Ryoko, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Iowa
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:417 Hawkeye Dr., Iowa City, IA, 52246, USA
Contact Telephone:319-541-6709
Co-Authors:R. Furukawa, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; J. Hourcade, Department of Computer Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Background: Families remain one of our most important sources of support, especially during stressful times, such as the birth of a new child or sending a child away to college. As today's families become increasingly mobile, it is often difficult to maintain a sense of family connectedness across large distances. With advances in computer-human interaction systems, including video-mediated communication (VMC), new opportunities are emerging for families trying to maintain their communication and connections. Purpose:To describe the experiences of individuals who use video-mediated communication (VMC) to communicate with distant family members. Method:Individuals were recruited using an internet listserve at a large Midwest university. Inclusion criteria required experience using VMC with distant family members. The resultant convenience sample included 341 individuals, with 75% falling between 20 to 30 years of age. Each completed a web-based survey containing focused and open-ended questions about their experience with and reflections about VMC. Findings:73% of the participants had at least one year of experience using VMC to communicate with distant family members. 60% reported using VMC at least once/week, although it was not their sole method of maintaining contact. Individuals used on the average four different methods such as email and cell phone. The most common reasons cited for using VMC were its visual cue and visual-audio communication features, followed by low cost, substitution of face-to-face communication or visitation, and feeling of closeness and involvement. The most commonly cited challenges with using VMC were technical issues and video quality. The participants considered family communication as important for feeling close and involved with family members and staying in touch, followed by sharing experiences, and getting support from family. Conclusion:Communication with distant family members is regarded as an important aspect in supporting family connectedness or cohesiveness. By substituting physical co-presence, VMC helps people feel connected with family through visual-audio perceptions despite quality and technical issues. This study provides evidence of people's acceptance of VMC as a useful tool to provide virtual co-presence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaintaining Family Connectedness Using Video-Mediated Communication: An Exploratory Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158865-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maintaining Family Connectedness Using Video-Mediated Communication: An Exploratory Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Furukawa, Ryoko, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">417 Hawkeye Dr., Iowa City, IA, 52246, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-541-6709</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ryoko-furukawa@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Furukawa, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; J. Hourcade, Department of Computer Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Families remain one of our most important sources of support, especially during stressful times, such as the birth of a new child or sending a child away to college. As today's families become increasingly mobile, it is often difficult to maintain a sense of family connectedness across large distances. With advances in computer-human interaction systems, including video-mediated communication (VMC), new opportunities are emerging for families trying to maintain their communication and connections. Purpose:To describe the experiences of individuals who use video-mediated communication (VMC) to communicate with distant family members. Method:Individuals were recruited using an internet listserve at a large Midwest university. Inclusion criteria required experience using VMC with distant family members. The resultant convenience sample included 341 individuals, with 75% falling between 20 to 30 years of age. Each completed a web-based survey containing focused and open-ended questions about their experience with and reflections about VMC. Findings:73% of the participants had at least one year of experience using VMC to communicate with distant family members. 60% reported using VMC at least once/week, although it was not their sole method of maintaining contact. Individuals used on the average four different methods such as email and cell phone. The most common reasons cited for using VMC were its visual cue and visual-audio communication features, followed by low cost, substitution of face-to-face communication or visitation, and feeling of closeness and involvement. The most commonly cited challenges with using VMC were technical issues and video quality. The participants considered family communication as important for feeling close and involved with family members and staying in touch, followed by sharing experiences, and getting support from family. Conclusion:Communication with distant family members is regarded as an important aspect in supporting family connectedness or cohesiveness. By substituting physical co-presence, VMC helps people feel connected with family through visual-audio perceptions despite quality and technical issues. This study provides evidence of people's acceptance of VMC as a useful tool to provide virtual co-presence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:28:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:28:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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