Results of a Mother-Daughter Photovoice Intervention to Promote the Emotional Well-Being of Latina Adolescents: A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158867
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Results of a Mother-Daughter Photovoice Intervention to Promote the Emotional Well-Being of Latina Adolescents: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Results of a Mother-Daughter Photovoice Intervention to Promote the Emotional Well-Being of Latina Adolescents: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Garcia, Carolyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:6126246179
Co-Authors:C. Garcia, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; S. Lindgren, , El Colegio High School, Minneapolis, MN;
Background: Latina adolescents exhibit high rates of depressive symptoms, in part due to normative and unique stressors. Notably, parent/child conflict is highest in adolescence, and most interpersonal conflict is with mothers. Strengthening the mother/daughter connection through improved communication/relationship may increase the social and emotional health of Latina adolescents and protect against depression or at-risk behaviors. Objective: To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a photovoice intervention to improve mother/daughter communication and connectedness. Methods: Latina adolescents and their mothers were recruited in dyads from a school to participate in a summer intervention. A nurse and social worker co-facilitated eight three-hour sessions in Spanish. In an intervention context, photovoice provides the mothers/daughters with a focus outside their relationship. They indirectly "work" on their relationship as they work side-by-side creating a photovoice project, mutually enjoying something without tension and practicing positive communication. Pre- and post-data consisted of a self-report survey and a video-recorded communication task. A focus group was conducted to ascertain participant reactions, likes, and dislikes regarding the intervention. Participants received digital cameras and incentives for session attendance. Results: Five dyads were invited to participate; three enrolled (n=6). All but one session were perfectly attended. Participants completed all data collection. Participants presented an exhibit of their photos and theme, "Culture and Tradition" with over 50 community attendees. One mother, in tears at the final shared meal, described the support she felt in the group and the loneliness she felt before participating. A mother shared, "I came to know my daughter better. She took beautiful pictures and I realized she has this sensitivity." Conclusions: This photovoice intervention appears to be a culturally, developmentally, and relationally acceptable strategy for Latina adolescents and mothers. Despite literature suggesting parent-involved interventions are not feasible, our study demonstrates feasibility and ability to optimize participation. Further studies with larger samples are needed to document immediate and over-time benefits.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResults of a Mother-Daughter Photovoice Intervention to Promote the Emotional Well-Being of Latina Adolescents: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158867-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Results of a Mother-Daughter Photovoice Intervention to Promote the Emotional Well-Being of Latina Adolescents: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garcia, Carolyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">6126246179</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">garcia@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Garcia, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; S. Lindgren, , El Colegio High School, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Latina adolescents exhibit high rates of depressive symptoms, in part due to normative and unique stressors. Notably, parent/child conflict is highest in adolescence, and most interpersonal conflict is with mothers. Strengthening the mother/daughter connection through improved communication/relationship may increase the social and emotional health of Latina adolescents and protect against depression or at-risk behaviors. Objective: To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a photovoice intervention to improve mother/daughter communication and connectedness. Methods: Latina adolescents and their mothers were recruited in dyads from a school to participate in a summer intervention. A nurse and social worker co-facilitated eight three-hour sessions in Spanish. In an intervention context, photovoice provides the mothers/daughters with a focus outside their relationship. They indirectly &quot;work&quot; on their relationship as they work side-by-side creating a photovoice project, mutually enjoying something without tension and practicing positive communication. Pre- and post-data consisted of a self-report survey and a video-recorded communication task. A focus group was conducted to ascertain participant reactions, likes, and dislikes regarding the intervention. Participants received digital cameras and incentives for session attendance. Results: Five dyads were invited to participate; three enrolled (n=6). All but one session were perfectly attended. Participants completed all data collection. Participants presented an exhibit of their photos and theme, &quot;Culture and Tradition&quot; with over 50 community attendees. One mother, in tears at the final shared meal, described the support she felt in the group and the loneliness she felt before participating. A mother shared, &quot;I came to know my daughter better. She took beautiful pictures and I realized she has this sensitivity.&quot; Conclusions: This photovoice intervention appears to be a culturally, developmentally, and relationally acceptable strategy for Latina adolescents and mothers. Despite literature suggesting parent-involved interventions are not feasible, our study demonstrates feasibility and ability to optimize participation. Further studies with larger samples are needed to document immediate and over-time benefits.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:28:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:28:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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